From organizational crisis to multi-platform salvation? Creative destruction and the recomposition of news media

Schlesinger, P. and Doyle, G. (2015) From organizational crisis to multi-platform salvation? Creative destruction and the recomposition of news media. Journalism: Theory, Practice and Criticism, 16(3), pp. 305-323. (doi:10.1177/1464884914530223)

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Abstract

Schumpeter’s trope of ‘creative destruction’ aptly describes current transformations of news media whose business models are adjusting to the twin challenges of digitization and the Internet. While most production studies focus on the journalistic labour process, based on current empirical research in the UK press and access to key decision-makers, this article presents case studies of the strategies pursued by the Financial Times and The Telegraph in migrating from print to digital. It shows how new conceptions of the news business are being articulated by managements and how production is being reshaped and increasingly driven by data analytics, and poses questions about the impact of these changes on journalistic practices.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Doyle, Professor Gillian and Schlesinger, Professor Philip
Authors: Schlesinger, P., and Doyle, G.
College/School:College of Arts > School of Culture and Creative Arts > Theatre Film and TV Studies
Journal Name:Journalism: Theory, Practice and Criticism
Publisher:Sage Publications Ltd.
ISSN:1464-8849
ISSN (Online):1741-3001
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2014 Sage Publications
First Published:First published in Journalism: Theory, Practice and Criticism 16(3):305-232
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
537981'Multi-platform media and the digital challenge: Strategy, Distribution and Policy'Gillian DoyleEconomic & Social Research Council (ESRC)ES/J011606/1CCA - THEATRE FILM AND TV STUDIES