Reactions to victimisation: why has anger been ignored?

Ditton, J., Farrall, S., Bannister, J., Gilchrist, E. and Pease, K. (1999) Reactions to victimisation: why has anger been ignored? Crime Prevention and Community Safety, 1(3), pp. 37-54. (doi:10.1057/palgrave.cpcs.8140024)

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Abstract

A previous article demonstrated, from an analysis of data derived from a quantitative survey of 1,629 adult Scottish residents, that being 'angry', rather than being 'afraid', was the reaction most respondents thought they would feel when imagining crime victimisation, irrespective of age, gender or victim-status. This article plumbs the same data base, but here considers reactions to actual victimisations experienced in the past year. When initial reactions are considered, only assault victims experience other reactions more than that of anger. When later reactions are examined, respondents report less anger (except for assault), much less fear (particularly for assault) and many more non-fear and non-anger responses. These results are placed in the context of other research, and against a qualitative background derived from interviews conducted with an initial sample of different respondents. Some possible reasons for the relative neglect of victim-anger are discussed.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Bannister, Mr Jonathan and Ditton, Dr Jason
Authors: Ditton, J., Farrall, S., Bannister, J., Gilchrist, E., and Pease, K.
College/School:College of Social Sciences > School of Social and Political Sciences > Urban Studies
College of Social Sciences > School of Social and Political Sciences > Sociology Anthropology and Applied Social Sciences
Journal Name:Crime Prevention and Community Safety
ISSN:1460-3780

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