Association of owner-reported noise with findings during dynamic respiratory endoscopy in Thoroughbred racehorses

Witte, S. H. P., Witte, T. H., Harriss, F., Kelly, G. and Pollock, P. (2010) Association of owner-reported noise with findings during dynamic respiratory endoscopy in Thoroughbred racehorses. Equine Veterinary Journal, 43(1), pp. 9-17. (doi: 10.1111/j.2042-3306.2010.00152.x)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.2042-3306.2010.00152.x

Abstract

Reasons for performing study: To determine the association between owner-reported noise and findings during dynamic respiratory endoscopy (DRE) in a large case series. Hypothesis: The sensitivity of owner-reported noise for dynamic upper respiratory tract obstructions in horses is low, and the specificity is high. Methods: One hundred horses underwent DRE for the investigation of abnormal respiratory noise and/or poor performance. The association of abnormal noise with findings during DRE was evaluated. Results: Eighty-five horses underwent DRE for the investigation of abnormal respiratory noise. Of these, 82% were found to have one or more obstructive upper respiratory tract abnormalities during DRE. Forty-eight percent of horses reported to gurgle, rattle or make a rough noise were diagnosed with solitary palatal dysfunction. A further 24% with this history showed palatal dysfunction in combination with an additional abnormality. Twenty-seven percent of horses with a history of whistling or roaring showed some degree of recurrent laryngeal neuropathy. Seven percent of horses with a history of whistling or roaring had vocal cord collapse as a solitary condition, whereas 40% had vocal cord collapse and another abnormality. The sensitivity of abnormal respiratory noise for any obstruction of the upper portion of the respiratory tract was high (84%), while the specificity was low (25%). Characteristic owner reported noise patterns showed moderate to low sensitivity for specific conditions. Whistling and roaring showed the highest specificity (>= 80%) for laryngeal dysfunction. Conclusion: Diagnosis of upper respiratory tract obstructions based solely on owner-reported noise and performance history may result in incomplete diagnoses. Clinical relevance: DRE should be performed in horses with abnormal respiratory noise to rule out complex conditions of the upper portion of the respiratory tract.Reasons for performing study: To determine the association between owner-reported noise and findings during dynamic respiratory endoscopy (DRE) in a large case series. Hypothesis: The sensitivity of owner-reported noise for dynamic upper respiratory tract obstructions in horses is low, and the specificity is high. Methods: One hundred horses underwent DRE for the investigation of abnormal respiratory noise and/or poor performance. The association of abnormal noise with findings during DRE was evaluated. Results: Eighty-five horses underwent DRE for the investigation of abnormal respiratory noise. Of these, 82% were found to have one or more obstructive upper respiratory tract abnormalities during DRE. Forty-eight percent of horses reported to gurgle, rattle or make a rough noise were diagnosed with solitary palatal dysfunction. A further 24% with this history showed palatal dysfunction in combination with an additional abnormality. Twenty-seven percent of horses with a history of whistling or roaring showed some degree of recurrent laryngeal neuropathy. Seven percent of horses with a history of whistling or roaring had vocal cord collapse as a solitary condition, whereas 40% had vocal cord collapse and another abnormality. The sensitivity of abnormal respiratory noise for any obstruction of the upper portion of the respiratory tract was high (84%), while the specificity was low (25%). Characteristic owner reported noise patterns showed moderate to low sensitivity for specific conditions. Whistling and roaring showed the highest specificity (>= 80%) for laryngeal dysfunction. Conclusion: Diagnosis of upper respiratory tract obstructions based solely on owner-reported noise and performance history may result in incomplete diagnoses. Clinical relevance: DRE should be performed in horses with abnormal respiratory noise to rule out complex conditions of the upper portion of the respiratory tract.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Pollock, Professor Patrick
Authors: Witte, S. H. P., Witte, T. H., Harriss, F., Kelly, G., and Pollock, P.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Biodiversity, One Health & Veterinary Medicine
Journal Name:Equine Veterinary Journal
ISSN:0425-1644

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