Conceptualization, use, and outcomes associated with compassion in the care of people with multiple sclerosis: a scoping review

Simpson, R., Posa, S., Bruno, T., Simpson, S. , Wasilewski, M. B., Robinson, L. R., Munce, S., Bayley, M. and Feinstein, A. (2022) Conceptualization, use, and outcomes associated with compassion in the care of people with multiple sclerosis: a scoping review. Journal of Neurology, (doi: 10.1007/s00415-022-11497-x) (PMID:36445508) (Early Online Publication)

[img] Text
285900.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

1MB

Abstract

Objective: Compassion is widely regarded as an important component of high-quality healthcare. However, its conceptualization, use, and associated outcomes in the care of people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) have not been synthesized. The aim of this review is to scope the peer reviewed academic literature on the conceptualization, use, and outcomes associated with compassion in the care of PwMS. Methods: Studies were eligible for inclusion if reporting primary research data from quantitative, qualitative, or mixed-methods studies on the conceptualization, use, and outcomes associated with compassion in the care of PwMS. Relevant studies were identified through searching five electronic databases (CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO) in January 2022. We followed the guidance outlined in the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) manual for evidence synthesis, and also referred to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses extension for Scoping Reviews Checklist (PRISMA-ScR). Simple descriptive methods were used to chart quantitative findings, and a descriptive approach with basic content analysis was employed to describe qualitative findings. Results: Fifteen studies were included (participant n = 1722): eight quantitative, six mixed-methods, one exclusively qualitative. Synthesized qualitative data revealed that PwMS conceptualize compassion as involving self-kindness, agency, and acceptance. PwMS report using self-compassion in response to unpleasant sensations and experiences. Quantitative findings suggest that compassion may mediate benefit finding, reduced distress, and improved quality of life (QoL) in PwMS, that those with the condition may become more compassionate through time, and that self-compassion specifically can be increased through training in mindfulness. In this context, greater self-compassion in PwMS correlates with less depression and fatigue, better resilience and QoL. Among studies, self-compassion was the most common outcome measure for PwMS. Conclusions: A nascent literature exists on the conceptualization, use, and outcomes associated with compassion in the care of PwMS. Further research is required to better understand what compassion means to PwMS and those caring for them. However, self-compassion can be cultivated among PwMS and may be helpful for managing unpleasant somatic symptoms and in benefit finding. Impact on other health outcomes is less clear. The use of compassion by health care providers in the care of PwMS is unstudied.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Simpson, Dr Robert and Simpson, Professor Sharon
Authors: Simpson, R., Posa, S., Bruno, T., Simpson, S., Wasilewski, M. B., Robinson, L. R., Munce, S., Bayley, M., and Feinstein, A.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Health & Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Health & Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
Journal Name:Journal of Neurology
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0340-5354
ISSN (Online):1432-1459
Published Online:29 November 2022
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2022 The Authors
First Published:First published in Journal of Neurology 2022
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record