Rapid elimination of cervical cancer while maintaining the harms and benefits ratio of cervical cancer screening: a modelling study

Jansen, E. E.L., de Kok, I. M.C.M., Kaljouw, S., Demirel, E., De Koning, H. J. and Hontelez, J. A.C. (2022) Rapid elimination of cervical cancer while maintaining the harms and benefits ratio of cervical cancer screening: a modelling study. BMC Medicine, 20(1), 433. (doi: 10.1186/s12916-022-02631-7) (PMID:36352410)

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Abstract

Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and intensifying screening expedite cervical cancer (CC) elimination, yet also deteriorate the balance between harms and benefits of screening. We aimed to find screening strategies that eliminate CC rapidly but maintain an acceptable harms-benefits ratio of screening. Methods: Two microsimulation models (STDSIM and MISCAN) were applied to simulate HPV transmission and CC screening for the Dutch female population between 2022 and 2100. We estimated the CC elimination year and harms-benefits ratios of screening for 228 unique scenarios varying in vaccination (coverage and vaccine type) and screening (coverage and number of lifetime invitations in vaccinated cohorts). The acceptable harms-benefits ratio was defined as the number of women needed to refer (NNR) to prevent one CC death under the current programme for unvaccinated cohorts (82.17). Results: Under current vaccination conditions (bivalent vaccine, 55% coverage in girls, 27.5% coverage in boys), maintaining current screening conditions is projected to eliminate CC by 2042, but increases the present NNR with 41%. Reducing the number of lifetime screens from presently five to three and increasing screening coverage (61% to 70%) would prevent an increase in harms and only delay elimination by 1 year. Scaling vaccination coverage to 90% in boys and girls with the nonavalent vaccine is estimated to eliminate CC by 2040 under current screening conditions, but exceeds the acceptable NNR with 23%. Here, changing from five to two lifetime screens would keep the NNR acceptable without delaying CC elimination. Conclusions: De-intensifying CC screening in vaccinated cohorts leads to little or no delay in CC elimination while it substantially reduces the harms of screening. Therefore, de-intensifying CC screening in vaccinated cohorts should be considered to ensure acceptable harms-benefits ratios on the road to CC elimination.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This study was funded by the EU-Framework Programme (Horizon 2020; project reference 634753; PI: prof HJ de Koning, MD PhD, Erasmus MC) of the European Commission.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:De Koning, Professor Harry
Authors: Jansen, E. E.L., de Kok, I. M.C.M., Kaljouw, S., Demirel, E., De Koning, H. J., and Hontelez, J. A.C.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Infection & Immunity
Journal Name:BMC Medicine
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1741-7015
ISSN (Online):1741-7015
Published Online:09 November 2022
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2022 The Authors
First Published:First published in BMC Medicine 20(1):433
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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