Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratios: associations with mortality in a haemodialysis cohort

Mayne, K. J., Lees, J. S. , Rutherford, E., Thomson, P. C., Traynor, J. P., Dey, V. , Lang, N. N. and Mark, P. B. (2023) Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratios: associations with mortality in a haemodialysis cohort. Clinical Kidney Journal, (doi: 10.1093/ckj/sfac248) (Early Online Publication)

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Abstract

Background: Lymphocyte ratios reflect inflammation and have been associated with adverse outcomes in a range of diseases. We sought to determine any association between neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and mortality in a haemodialysis cohort, including a COVID-19 infection subpopulation. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed of adults commencing hospital haemodialysis in the West of Scotland 2010–2021. NLR and PLR were calculated from routine samples around haemodialysis initiation. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards analyses assessed mortality associations. Results: In 1720 haemodialysis patients over a median of 21.9 (IQR 9.1–42.9) months, there were 840 all-cause deaths. NLR but not PLR was associated with all-cause mortality after multivariable adjustment [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) for in participants with baseline NLR in quartile 4 (NLR ≥ 8.23) versus quartile 1 (NLR < 3.12) 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.32–2.00]. The association was stronger for cardiovascular death (NLR quartile 4 versus 1 aHR 3.06, 95% CI 1.53–6.09) than for non-cardiovascular death (NLR quartile 4 versus 1 aHR 1.85, 95% CI 1.34–2.56). In the COVID-19 subpopulation, both NLR and PLR at haemodialysis initiation were associated with risk of COVID-19-related death after adjustment for age and sex (NLR: aHR 4.69, 95% CI 1.48–14.92 and PLR: aHR 3.40, 95% CI 1.02–11.36; for highest vs lowest quartiles). Conclusions: NLR is strongly associated with mortality and specifically COVID-19-related death in haemodialysis patients while the association between PLR and adverse outcomes is weaker. NLR is an inexpensive, readily available biomarker with potential utility in risk stratification of haemodialysis patients.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:JSL is funded by a Chief Scientist Office (Scotland) Postdoctoral Lectureship Award (PCL/20/10). NNL is supported by a BHF Centre of Research Excellence Grant (RE/18/6/34217).
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Mark, Professor Patrick and Dey, Dr Vishal and Lees, Jennifer and Mayne, Dr Kaitlin and Traynor, Dr Jamie and Thomson, Dr Peter and Lang, Dr Ninian and Rutherford, Dr Elaine
Authors: Mayne, K. J., Lees, J. S., Rutherford, E., Thomson, P. C., Traynor, J. P., Dey, V., Lang, N. N., and Mark, P. B.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Cardiovascular & Metabolic Health
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:Clinical Kidney Journal
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:2048-8505
ISSN (Online):2048-8513
Published Online:18 November 2022
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2022 The Authors
First Published:First published in Clinical Kidney Journal 2022
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
303944BHF Centre of ExcellenceColin BerryBritish Heart Foundation (BHF)RE/18/6/34217CAMS - Cardiovascular Science