Understanding changes in the locations of drinking occasions in Great Britain: an age-period-cohort analysis of repeat cross-sectional market research data, 2001-2019

Hardie, I. , Sasso, A., Holmes, J. and Meier, P. S. (2023) Understanding changes in the locations of drinking occasions in Great Britain: an age-period-cohort analysis of repeat cross-sectional market research data, 2001-2019. Drug and Alcohol Review, 42(1), pp. 105-118. (doi: 10.1111/dar.13562) (PMID:36222548)

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Abstract

Introduction: The 21st century has seen wide-ranging changes in drinking locations in Great Britain, with on-trade alcohol sales decreasing and off-trade sales increasing. To better understand the underlying time-trends in consumer behaviour, we examine age-period-cohort (APC) effects related to changes in the share of individuals' drinking occasions taking place in: (i) on-trade versus off-trade locations; and (ii) specific on-trade or off-trade locations, that is traditional/community pubs, modern pubs/bars/café bars, nightclubs/late-night venues, restaurants/pub restaurants, social/working men's clubs, golf/other sports clubs/venues, at home (social setting) and at home (non-social setting). Methods: Repeat cross-sectional 1-week drinking diary data, collected 2001–2019. APC analysis via negative binomial regression models for each gender (N = 162,296 men, 138,452 women). Results: A smaller/declining proportion of occasions took place in on-trade compared to off-trade locations. Recent cohorts tended to have a larger share of on-trade occasions than previous cohorts, driven by their larger share of occasions in modern pubs/bars/café bars and nightclubs/late-night venues. Meanwhile, occasions in social/working men's clubs, golf/other sports clubs/venues and traditional/community pubs tended to be popular among older men, but have declined. Finally, the growth of off-trade drinking appears to be driven by a growth of off-trade drinking in non-social settings, in particular by older people/cohorts. Discussion and Conclusion: Our findings highlight the declining prominence of certain on-trade locations, and increasing prominence of home drinking in non-social settings, within British drinking practices. While rising non-social home drinking is concerning, it is positive from a public health perspective that it does not appear to be shared by recent cohorts.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This work was supported by the Economic and Social Research Council (grant number: ES/R005257/2). IH and PM were also supported by the Medical Research Council (grant number: MC_UU_00022/5) and the Scottish Government Chief Scientist Office (grant number: SPHSU20).
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Hardie, Dr Iain and Meier, Professor Petra
Creator Roles:
Hardie, I.Conceptualization, Formal analysis, Methodology, Writing – original draft
Meier, P.Conceptualization, Funding acquisition, Project administration, Writing – review and editing
Authors: Hardie, I., Sasso, A., Holmes, J., and Meier, P. S.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Health & Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Health & Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
Journal Name:Drug and Alcohol Review
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:0959-5236
ISSN (Online):1465-3362
Published Online:12 October 2022
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2022 The Authors
First Published:First published in Drug and Alcohol Review 42(1): 105-118
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
313837Understanding stability and change in British drinking using 16 years of market research dataPetra MeierEconomic and Social Research Council (ESRC)ES/R005257/2HW - MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit
3048231Systems science research in public healthPetra MeierMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_00022/5HW - MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit
3048231Systems science research in public healthPetra MeierOffice of the Chief Scientific Adviser (CSO)SPHSU20HW - MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit