Tissue-specific reductions in mitochondrial efficiency and increased ROS release rates during ageing in zebra finches, Taeniopygia guttata

Salmón, P. , Millet, C., Selman, C. , Monaghan, P. and Dawson, N. J. (2022) Tissue-specific reductions in mitochondrial efficiency and increased ROS release rates during ageing in zebra finches, Taeniopygia guttata. GeroScience, (doi: 10.1007/s11357-022-00624-1) (PMID:35986126) (Early Online Publication)

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Abstract

Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage have long been suggested as critically important mechanisms underlying the ageing process in animals. However, conflicting data exist on whether this involves increased production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) during ageing. We employed high‐resolution respirometry and fluorometry on flight muscle (pectoralis major) and liver mitochondria to simultaneously examine mitochondrial function and ROS (H2O2) release rates in young (3 months) and old (4 years) zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). Respiratory capacities for oxidative phosphorylation did not differ between the two age groups in either tissue. Respiratory control ratios (RCR) of liver mitochondria also did not differ between the age classes. However, RCR in muscle mitochondria was 55% lower in old relative to young birds, suggesting that muscle mitochondria in older individuals are less efficient. Interestingly, this observed reduction in muscle RCR was driven almost entirely by higher mitochondrial LEAK-state respiration. Maximum mitochondrial ROS release rates were found to be greater in both flight muscle (1.3-fold) and the liver (1.9-fold) of old birds. However, while maximum ROS (H2O2) release rates from mitochondria increased with age across both liver and muscle tissues, the liver demonstrated a proportionally greater age-related increase in ROS release than muscle. This difference in age-related increases in ROS release rates between muscle and liver tissues may be due to increased mitochondrial leakiness in the muscle, but not the liver, of older birds. This suggests that age-related changes in cellular function seem to occur in a tissue-specific manner in zebra finches, with flight muscle exhibiting signs of minimising age-related increase in ROS release, potentially to reduce damage to this crucial tissue in older individuals.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Monaghan, Professor Pat and Selman, Professor Colin and Millet, Dr Caroline and Dawson, Dr Neal and Salmon, Dr Pablo
Authors: Salmón, P., Millet, C., Selman, C., Monaghan, P., and Dawson, N. J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Biodiversity, One Health & Veterinary Medicine
Journal Name:GeroScience
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:2509-2715
ISSN (Online):2509-2723
Published Online:19 August 2022
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2022 The Authors
First Published:First published in GeoScience 2022
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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