Results from Scotland’s 2021 report card on physical activity and health for children and youth: grades, secular trends, and socio-economic inequalities

Bardid, F., Tomaz, S. A., Johnstone, A. , Robertson, J., Craig, L. C.A. and Reilly, J. J. (2022) Results from Scotland’s 2021 report card on physical activity and health for children and youth: grades, secular trends, and socio-economic inequalities. Journal of Exercise Science and Fitness, 20(4), pp. 317-322. (doi: 10.1016/j.jesf.2022.07.002) (PMID:36033941) (PMCID:PMC9386094)

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Abstract

Background: The 2021 Active Healthy Kids Scotland Report Card aimed to identify secular trends and socio-economic inequalities, and to assess the health of children and youth prior to COVID-19. Methods: An expert panel searched for data published in 2018–2020. Grades were assigned to nationally representative data using the Active Healthy Kids Global Alliance methodology. Results: The expert panel, following national consultation, awarded the following grades: Community/Environment B-, Organized Sport and Physical Activity B-, Government/Policy C/C+, Active Transportation C-, Family/Peers D-, Recreational Screen Time F. Five indicators were graded inconclusive (INC): Overall Physical Activity; Active Play; Physical Fitness; Diet; Obesity. Grades have remained stable or declined, and surveillance has reduced, increasing the number of INC grades. There were marked socio-economic inequalities for eight indicators (Recreational Screen Time; Overall Physical Activity; Organized Sport & Physical Activity; Active Transportation; Diet; Obesity; Family/Peers; Community/Environment). Conclusions: Despite a decade of favorable policy, physical activity and health of children and youth has not improved, and marked socio-economic inequalities continue to persist in Scotland. There is a clear need for greater monitoring of physical activity and health, and improved policy implementation and evaluation, particularly as many indicators and related inequalities may have worsened following the COVID-19 pandemic.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:AJ was supported by the UK Medical Research Council and the Chief Scientist Office (grant numbers MC_UU_00022/1, MC_UU_00022/4; SPHSU16, SPHSU19).
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Johnstone, Dr Avril
Authors: Bardid, F., Tomaz, S. A., Johnstone, A., Robertson, J., Craig, L. C.A., and Reilly, J. J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Health & Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
Journal Name:Journal of Exercise Science and Fitness
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1728-869X
ISSN (Online):2226-5104
Published Online:19 July 2022
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2022 The Society of Chinese Scholars on Exercise Physiology and Fitness
First Published:First published in Journal of Exercise Science and Fitness 20(4): 317-322
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons licence

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
3048231Complexity in healthSharon SimpsonMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_00022/1HW - MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit
3048231Places and healthRich MitchellMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_00022/4HW - MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit
3048231Complexity in healthSharon SimpsonOffice of the Chief Scientific Adviser (CSO)SPHSU16HW - MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit
3048231Places and healthRich MitchellOffice of the Chief Scientific Adviser (CSO)SPHSU19HW - MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit