Lower limb injuries in an English professional football club: injury analysis and recommendations for prevention

Fares, M., Stewart, K., McBride, M. and Maclean, J. (2022) Lower limb injuries in an English professional football club: injury analysis and recommendations for prevention. Physician and Sportsmedicine, (doi: 10.1080/00913847.2022.2045176) (PMID:35191360) (Early Online Publication)

Full text not currently available from Enlighten.

Abstract

Background: Lower limb injuries constitute a problem in the sport of football. Our aim is to explore patterns and trends of lower limb injuries in an English professional football club. Methods: This is a descriptive epidemiological study. Reports provided by the club’s physical therapy team were screened for injuries among professional football players sustained over four seasons, from 2015/2016 to 2018/2019. Data included setting of injury (in-match or training), anatomical location of injury, type of injury, number of days off and month of injury. Results: A total of 296 lower limb injuries were recorded in our study, with a rate of 11.14 per 1000 football hours. Injury rate during games was 51.38 per 1000 football hours, significantly greater than that during training at 3.81 per 1000 football hours (p = 0.021). The thigh was significantly the most commonly injured location at 4.67 per 1000 football hours (p < 0.001). Grade I tears were the most common injury type at 1.73 per 1000 football hours, significantly greater than grade III tears (p = 0.027), contusions (p = 0.043), fractures (p = 0.02), and lacerations (p = 0.019). Injury rates were found to be greatest during preseason and declined as season progressed. On average, an injury sidelined the affected footballer for a total of 20 days. Conclusion: Lower limb injuries were more common during matches than training. The thigh is the most common injury location, and grade I muscle tear was the most common type of injury. Injury rates were higher early on in the season. Potential prevention strategies include spacing out competition, adopting training and exercise regimens that cater for recovery, and increasing research regarding injury mechanisms.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:MacLean, Dr John and Stewart, Miss Katy
Authors: Fares, M., Stewart, K., McBride, M., and Maclean, J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Cardiovascular & Metabolic Health
Journal Name:Physician and Sportsmedicine
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:0091-3847
ISSN (Online):2326-3660
Published Online:22 February 2022

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record