Osteoporosis and its association with cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, and cancer: findings from the UK Biobank prospective cohort study

Rodríguez-Gómez, I. et al. (2022) Osteoporosis and its association with cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, and cancer: findings from the UK Biobank prospective cohort study. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 97(1), pp. 110-121. (doi: 10.1016/j.mayocp.2021.07.019) (PMID:34996542)

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Abstract

Objective: To investigate sex-specific associations of osteoporosis with incidence of and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD), respiratory disease, and cancer as well as with all-cause mortality. Methods: In total, 305,072 participants (53% [161,383] women) of UK Biobank were included in this study (2007-2010). Self-reported diagnosis of osteoporosis at baseline was the exposure of interest. The outcomes were CVD, respiratory disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), all cancer, and prostate and breast cancer incidence and mortality and all-cause mortality. Associations between osteoporosis and outcomes were investigated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results: In men, osteoporosis was associated with a higher incident risk of all respiratory diseases (hazard ratio [HR], 1.26; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.50) including COPD (HR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.38 to 2.40). Men with osteoporosis also had a higher mortality risk from all causes (HR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.38 to 2.11), CVD (HR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.19 to 2.37), respiratory disease (HR, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.70 to 3.24), and COPD (HR, 3.64; 95% CI, 2.24 to 5.91). These associations persisted after adjustment for age, body mass index, and comorbidities. Women with osteoporosis had a higher risk of incident CVD (HR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.97 to 1.44), respiratory disease (HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.13 to 1.33), and COPD (HR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.52). Women with osteoporosis also had a higher mortality risk from respiratory disease (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.72) and breast cancer (HR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.14 to 2.26). Conclusion: Compared with women, men with osteoporosis had a higher risk of all-cause mortality, mortality from respiratory diseases including COPD, and cancer incidence. Osteoporosis was strongly associated with respiratory disease and COPD in both sexes, even after full adjustment for covariates, although men with osteoporosis experienced a higher risk of adverse outcomes.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Rodriguez Gomez, Dr Irene and Celis, Dr Carlos and Gray, Professor Stuart and Ferguson, Dr Lyn and Ho, Dr Frederick and Welsh, Dr Paul and Iliodromiti, Dr Stamatina and Pell, Professor Jill and Cleland, Professor John and Petermann-Rocha, Mrs Fanny and Sattar, Professor Naveed
Authors: Rodríguez-Gómez, I., Gray, S. R., Ho, F. K., Petermann-Rocha, F., Welsh, P., Cleland, J., Iliodromiti, S., Ara, I., Pell, J., Sattar, N., Ferguson, L. D., and Celis-Morales, C.
Subjects:R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Cardiovascular & Metabolic Health
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Health & Wellbeing > Public Health
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Health & Wellbeing > Robertson Centre
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0025-6196
ISSN (Online):1942-5546
Published Online:04 January 2022
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2021 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research
First Published:First published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings 97(1): 110-121
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

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