Study of Theileria annulata population structure during bovine infection and following transmission to ticks

Gubbels, M.J., Katzer, F., Shiels, B.R. and Jongejan, F. (2001) Study of Theileria annulata population structure during bovine infection and following transmission to ticks. Parasitology, 123(6), pp. 553-561. (doi:10.1017/S0031182001008757) (PMID:11814042)

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Abstract

Tams1 is the polymorphic immunodominant merozoite-piroplasm surface protein of Theileria annulata. Evidence for selection of divergent forms of Tams1 has been obtained recently. This study was performed to address whether selection takes place during persistent infection of the bovine host or during passage through the Hyalomma tick vector. Four calves were infected with a T. annulata isolate representing multiple parasite genotypes. The development of the parasite population was analysed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) using the Tams1 gene as a marker. In addition, the parasitaemia was measured by a semi-quantitative reverse line blot hybridization assay in order to correlate Tams1 variation to changes in parasitaemia. It was found that both parasitaemia and parasite population displayed limited variation during persistent infection. Ticks were allowed to acquire T. annulata during 2 periods of the bovine infection. Tams1 alleles detected in ticks fed during acute infection were identical to the population in the bovine host. However, ticks fed during the carrier status acquired parasites showing a single Tams1 isotype that represented, in several cases, a minor population in the bovine host at the time of infestation. Although only a limited number of ticks were studied, these preliminary data suggest that specific parasite genotypes may be selected during tick transmission from a carrier animal.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Shiels, Professor Brian
Authors: Gubbels, M.J., Katzer, F., Shiels, B.R., and Jongejan, F.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
Journal Name:Parasitology
ISSN:0031-1820
ISSN (Online):1469-8161
Published Online:06 February 2003

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