International perspectives on social media use among adolescents: implications for mental and social well-being and substance use

Boniel-Nissim, M., van den Eijnden, R. J.J.M., Furstova, J., Marino, C., Lahti, H., Inchley, J. , Smigelskas, K., Vieno, A. and Badura, P. (2022) International perspectives on social media use among adolescents: implications for mental and social well-being and substance use. Computers in Human Behavior, 129, 107144. (doi: 10.1016/j.chb.2021.107144)

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Abstract

In the present study, we aimed to explore the relationship between intensity of social media use (SMU), problematic SMU and well-being outcomes. Four categories of SMU were developed taking into account both intensity of use and problematic SMU simultaneously: non-active; active; intense; and problematic use. Using these four categories, we assessed associations between SMU and mental and social well-being, and substance use. Data from 190,089 respondents aged 11, 13, and 15 years from 42 countries involved in the Health Behavior in School-aged Children (HBSC) study were analyzed. With a slight cross-national variance, 78% of adolescents in the sample were classified as active or intense users, and 7% showed signs of problematic SMU. The remaining 15% belonged to the non-active users. Three-level regression analyses revealed that the problematic users showed the least favorable mental and social well-being profile and the highest level of substance use. Compared with active users, non-active users reported lower mental and social well-being, but also the lowest substance use levels. Intense non-problematic users showed the highest levels of social well-being. Our findings highlight the importance of assessing both the intensity and problematic component of SMU to reliably assess associations with mental and social well-being and substance use.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:The work was supported by the Technology Agency of the Czech Republic (ÉTA TL03000291) and by the Czech Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (Inter-Excellence; LTT18020). Henri Lahti’s contribution to the manuscript was further supported by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health of Finland. Joanna Inchley is supported by the UK Medical Research Council (MC_UU_00022/1) and the Scottish Government Chief Scientist Office (SPHSU16)
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Inchley, Dr Joanna
Creator Roles:
Inchley, J.Writing – original draft, Writing – review and editing
Authors: Boniel-Nissim, M., van den Eijnden, R. J.J.M., Furstova, J., Marino, C., Lahti, H., Inchley, J., Smigelskas, K., Vieno, A., and Badura, P.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Health & Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
Journal Name:Computers in Human Behavior
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0747-5632
ISSN (Online):1873-7692
Published Online:13 December 2021
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2021 The Authors
First Published:First published in Computers in Human Behavior 129: 107144
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
3048231Complexity in healthSharon SimpsonMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_00022/1HW - MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit
3048231Complexity in healthSharon SimpsonChief Scientist Office (CSO)SPHSU16HW - MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit