Supported self-management in community stroke rehabilitation: what is it and how does it work? A protocol for a realist evaluation study

Kidd, L. et al. (2022) Supported self-management in community stroke rehabilitation: what is it and how does it work? A protocol for a realist evaluation study. BMJ Open, 12(1), e055491. (doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2021-055491) (PMID:35058265) (PMCID:PMC8783824)

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Abstract

Introduction: A growing evidence base demonstrates the effectiveness of supported self-management in stroke for stroke survivors and their families. However, there is significant variation in its implementation in community stroke care and little understanding about how supported self-management works and is delivered across different settings, models used and contexts of community stroke rehabilitation. Methods and analysis: Using a mixed method, realist approach across two phases, this protocol describes a study on community-based supported self-management. The aim is to identify the mechanisms and outcomes of supported self-management in stroke and to understand how supported self-management is implemented in different contexts of community stroke rehabilitation. Phase 1 involves (1) a realist synthesis, (2) a scoping and mapping of current community rehabilitation settings and (3) a Q-methodology study to develop initial programme theories about how community-based supported self-management works, for whom and in what contexts. Phase 2 involves realist informed interviews/focus groups with stroke survivors, community rehabilitation practitioners and team managers from across Scotland to test and refine programme theories and an explanatory model for how supported self-management works across different contexts of community-based stroke rehabilitation. Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval and R & D approvals have been granted from East of Scotland Research Ethics Committee (REC reference number: 19/ES/0055) and participating NHS boards. An understanding of how, for whom and in what contexts community-based supported self-management works will help to strengthen its delivery in practice. Such an understanding will enable the design of context-specific recommendations for policy and practice that genuinely reflect the challenges in implementing supported self-management in community stroke care. Results will be disseminated to clinical partners working in community stroke rehabilitation, stroke survivors and families and to policymakers and third sector partners involved in the provision of long-term support for people affected by stroke.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:Funding: This work was supported by The Stroke Association (Grant number SA PG 18\100067).
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Kidd, Dr Lisa and Barber, Dr Mark and Gallacher, Dr Katie and Duncan Millar, Dr Julie and Quinn, Dr Terry
Authors: Kidd, L., Duncan Millar, J., Mason, H., Quinn, T., Gallacher, K. I., Jones, F., Fisher, R. J., Lebedis, T., Barber, M., Brennan, K., and Smith, M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Cardiovascular & Metabolic Health
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Health & Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Nursing and Health Care
Journal Name:BMJ Open
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:2044-6055
ISSN (Online):2044-6055
Published Online:20 January 2022
Copyright Holders:Copyright © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2022
First Published:First published in BMJ Open 12(1): e055491
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons licence

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
303248Improving the implementation of supported stroke self-management: what does it look like and what makes it `work' in different contextsLisa KiddStroke Association (STROKEAS)SA PG 18\100067Med - Nursing & Healthcare