The Jew in the thornbush: German fairy tales and anti-semitism in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries: Musaus, Naubert and the Grimms'

Martin, L. (2006) The Jew in the thornbush: German fairy tales and anti-semitism in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries: Musaus, Naubert and the Grimms'. Modern Language Review, pp. 123-141.

[img] Text
24391.pdf

126kB

Abstract

This essay looks at a particular time and place of the tale-telling tradition, namely the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries in Germany, at tales recorded or written by the well-known brothers Grimm and by two of their less famous precursors, Johann Karl August Musäus and Benedikte Naubert, with a view to seeing how these writers use violence in their stories. The narratives studied are all Märchen – that is, folk or fairy tales. They do not aspire to the cosmology of myth or saga, for example; they are meant for sheer entertainment, whatever underlying messages or revelations about cultural values one may find in them.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Martin, Dr Laura
Authors: Martin, L.
Subjects:P Language and Literature > PT Germanic literature
College/School:College of Arts > School of Modern Languages and Cultures > German
Journal Name:Modern Language Review
Publisher:Modern Languages Research Association
ISSN:0026-7937
ISBN:9783039102662
First Published:First published in Modern Language Review
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record