A poroelastic immersed finite element framework for modeling cardiac perfusion and fluid-structure interaction

Heath Richardson, S. I., Gao, H. , Cox, J., Janiczek, R., Griffith, B. E., Berry, C. and Luo, X. (2021) A poroelastic immersed finite element framework for modeling cardiac perfusion and fluid-structure interaction. International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering, 37(5), e3446. (doi: 10.1002/cnm.3446) (PMID:33559359)

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Abstract

Modern approaches to modelling cardiac perfusion now commonly describe the myocardium using the framework of poroelasticity. Cardiac tissue can be described as a saturated porous medium composed of the pore fluid (blood) and the skeleton (myocytes and collagen scaffold). In previous studies fluid‐structure interaction in the heart has been treated in a variety of ways, but in most cases, the myocardium is assumed to be a hyperelastic fibre‐reinforced material. Conversely, models that treat the myocardium as a poroelastic material typically neglect interactions between the myocardium and intracardiac blood flow. This work presents a poroelastic immersed finite element framework to model left ventricular dynamics in a three‐phase poroelastic system composed of the pore blood fluid, the skeleton, and the chamber fluid. We benchmark our approach by examining a pair of prototypical poroelastic formations using a simple cubic geometry considered in the prior work by Chapelle et al. (2010). This cubic model also enables us to compare the differences between system behaviour when using isotropic and anisotropic material models for the skeleton. With this framework, we also simulate the poroelastic dynamics of a three‐dimensional left ventricle, in which the myocardium is described by the Holzapfel–Ogden law. Results obtained using the poroelastic model are compared to those of a corresponding hyperelastic model studied previously. We find that the poroelastic LV behaves differently from the hyperelastic LV model. For example, accounting for perfusion results in a smaller diastolic chamber volume, agreeing well with the well‐known wall‐stiffening effect under perfusion reported previously. Meanwhile differences in systolic function, such as fibre strain in the basal and middle ventricle, are found to be comparatively minor.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Luo, Professor Xiaoyu and Berry, Professor Colin and Gao, Dr Hao and Richardson, Mr Scott and Griffith, Dr Boyce
Authors: Heath Richardson, S. I., Gao, H., Cox, J., Janiczek, R., Griffith, B. E., Berry, C., and Luo, X.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Science and Engineering > School of Mathematics and Statistics > Mathematics
Journal Name:International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:2040-7939
ISSN (Online):2040-7947
Published Online:08 February 2021
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2021 The Authors
First Published:First published in International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering 37(5): e3446
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons license

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
172141EPSRC Centre for Multiscale soft tissue mechanics with application to heart & cancerRaymond OgdenEngineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)EP/N014642/1M&S - Mathematics
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