From underdetermined to overdetermined space: public/private interfaces and activities in residential alleys

Moreau, M. (2020) From underdetermined to overdetermined space: public/private interfaces and activities in residential alleys. Journal of Urbanism: International Research on Placemaking and Urban Sustainability, (doi: 10.1080/17549175.2020.1858445) (Early Online Publication)

[img] Text
226557.pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 23 June 2022.

1MB

Abstract

The underlying logic of two well-established urban design concepts, active use and active interface, while applicable to streets and activity centres, may have limited bearing on residual urban spaces. As such spaces can be perceived as problematic, they are often replaced with conventional forms rather than valued for their uniqueness. This study examines the relationships between public/private interfaces and activities in residential alleys in Melbourne, Australia. These alleys are undervalued urban features that sum to vast amounts of land in areas deprived of public space. They are reappropriated for social activities and are also used as access for infill developments. The findings show that the conventional infill developments create overdetermined conditions that limit social activities. In contrast, the impermeable and blank interfaces that would be problematic elsewhere enable a wide range of usage. The key quality of these preferred interfaces is underdetermination, where multiple possibilities could emerge and exist simultaneously.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This research was made possible through award of an Australian Postgraduate Award (later Research Training Program) to the author.
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Moreau, Dr Miza
Authors: Moreau, M.
College/School:College of Science and Engineering > School of Geographical and Earth Sciences
Journal Name:Journal of Urbanism: International Research on Placemaking and Urban Sustainability
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1754-9175
ISSN (Online):1754-9183
Published Online:23 December 2020
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor and Francis Group
First Published:First published in Journal of Urbanism: International Research on Placemaking and Urban Sustainability 2020
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record