Occupation and risk of severe COVID-19: prospective cohort study of 120 075 UK Biobank participants

Mutambudzi, M. et al. (2021) Occupation and risk of severe COVID-19: prospective cohort study of 120 075 UK Biobank participants. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 78(5), pp. 307-314. (doi: 10.1136/oemed-2020-106731) (PMID:33298533)

[img] Text
225950.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

939kB
[img] Text
225950Suppl.pdf - Supplemental Material

628kB

Abstract

Objectives: To investigate severe COVID-19 risk by occupational group. Methods: Baseline UK Biobank data (2006–10) for England were linked to SARS-CoV-2 test results from Public Health England (16 March to 26 July 2020). Included participants were employed or self-employed at baseline, alive and aged <65 years in 2020. Poisson regression models were adjusted sequentially for baseline demographic, socioeconomic, work-related, health, and lifestyle-related risk factors to assess risk ratios (RRs) for testing positive in hospital or death due to COVID-19 by three occupational classification schemes (including Standard Occupation Classification (SOC) 2000). Results: Of 120 075 participants, 271 had severe COVID-19. Relative to non-essential workers, healthcare workers (RR 7.43, 95% CI 5.52 to 10.00), social and education workers (RR 1.84, 95% CI 1.21 to 2.82) and other essential workers (RR 1.60, 95% CI 1.05 to 2.45) had a higher risk of severe COVID-19. Using more detailed groupings, medical support staff (RR 8.70, 95% CI 4.87 to 15.55), social care (RR 2.46, 95% CI 1.47 to 4.14) and transport workers (RR 2.20, 95% CI 1.21 to 4.00) had the highest risk within the broader groups. Compared with white non-essential workers, non-white non-essential workers had a higher risk (RR 3.27, 95% CI 1.90 to 5.62) and non-white essential workers had the highest risk (RR 8.34, 95% CI 5.17 to 13.47). Using SOC 2000 major groups, associate professional and technical occupations, personal service occupations and plant and machine operatives had a higher risk, compared with managers and senior officials. Conclusions: Essential workers have a higher risk of severe COVID-19. These findings underscore the need for national and organisational policies and practices that protect and support workers with an elevated risk of severe COVID-19.

Item Type:Articles
Keywords:COVID-19, occupation, work, employment, healthcare worker.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Jani, Dr Bhautesh and Hastie, Dr Claire and Demou, Dr Evangelia and Ho, Dr Frederick and Gill, Professor Jason and Welsh, Dr Paul and Anderson, Dr Jana and Nicholl, Dr Barbara and Niedzwiedz, Dr Claire and Mair, Professor Frances and O'Donnell, Professor Kate and Katikireddi, Professor Vittal and Mutambudzi, Dr Miriam and Celis, Dr Carlos and MacDonald, Professor Ewan and Pell, Professor Jill and Cleland, Professor John and Leyland, Professor Alastair and Mackay, Professor Daniel and Sattar, Professor Naveed
Authors: Mutambudzi, M., Niedzwiedz, C. L., Macdonald, E. B., Leyland, A. H., Mair, F. S., Anderson, J. J., Celis-Morales, C. A., Cleland, J. G., Forbes, J., Gill, J. M.R., Hastie, C. E., Ho, F. K., Jani, B. D., Mackay, D. F., Nicholl, B. I., O'Donnell, C. A., Sattar, N., Welsh, P., Pell, J. P., Katikireddi, S. V., and Demou, E.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Public Health
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Robertson Centre
Journal Name:Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:1351-0711
ISSN (Online):1470-7926
Published Online:09 December 2020
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2020 The Authors
First Published:First published in Occupational and Environmental Medicine 78(5): 307-314
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy
Related URLs:

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record

Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
727651SPHSU Core Renewal: Measuring and Analysing Socioeconomic Inequalities in Health Research ProgrammeAlastair LeylandMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_12017/13IHW - MRC/CSO SPHU
Chief Scientist Office (CSO)SPHSU13
302182A machine learning approach to understanding comorbidity between mental and physical health conditionsClaire NiedzwiedzMedical Research Council (MRC)MR/R024774/1HW - Public Health
172690Understanding the impacts of welfare policy on health: A novel data linkage studySrinivasa KatikireddiChief Scientist Office (CSO)SCAF/15/02HW - Public Health