Accelerometry-assessed sleep duration and timing in late childhood and adolescence in Scottish schoolchildren: a feasibility study

Lyall, L. M. et al. (2020) Accelerometry-assessed sleep duration and timing in late childhood and adolescence in Scottish schoolchildren: a feasibility study. PLoS ONE, 15(12), e0242080. (doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0242080) (PMID:33259503) (PMCID:PMC7707491)

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Abstract

Children and adolescents commonly suffer from sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances, which may contribute to poorer mental health and wellbeing during this critical developmental phase. Many studies however rely on self-reported sleep measures. This study assessed whether accelerometry data collection was feasible within the school setting as a method for investigating the extent of sleep and circadian disruption, and associations with subjective wellbeing, in Scotland. Fourteen days of wrist-worn accelerometry data were collected from 69 pupils, aged 10–14 years. Objective measures of sleep timing, sleep duration and circadian rest-activity patterns were derived. Questionnaires assessed subjective sleep timing, depressive symptoms, and experiences of wearing the accelerometer. Pupils slept on average less than 8 hours per night, failing to meet standard age-specific recommendations. Sleep timing was later and duration longer on weekends compared to weekdays (B = 0.87, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.70, 1.04; B = 0.49, 95% CI 0.29, 0.69), indicating social jetlag. Lower daytime activity was correlated with higher depressive symptoms (r = -0.84, p = 0.008). Compared to primary school pupils, secondary pupils had shorter sleep window duration and lower circadian relative amplitude. Over half of participants reported some discomfort/inconvenience wearing the accelerometer. These data highlight that inadequate sleep is prevalent in this sample of schoolchildren. Future, larger scale investigations will examine in more detail the associations between sleep, circadian function and physical activity with mental health and wellbeing.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Sangha, Natasha and Wyse, Dr Cathy and Haughton, Mrs Dawn and Brown, Dr Judith and Smith, Professor Daniel and Campbell, Mrs Kate and Moore, Professor Laurence and Hindle, Miss Elaine and Lyall, Dr Laura and Inchley, Dr Joanna and Simpson, Professor Sharon
Creator Roles:
Lyall, L. M.Data curation, Formal analysis, Investigation, Methodology, Project administration, Resources, Validation, Visualization, Writing – original draft, Writing – review and editing
Sangha, N.Writing – original draft, Writing – review and editing
Wyse, C.Resources, Software, Supervision, Visualization, Writing – review and editing
Hindle, E.Data curation, Investigation, Project administration, Resources, Writing – review and editing
Haughton, D.Data curation, Investigation, Resources, Visualization, Writing – review and editing
Campbell, K.Data curation, Investigation, Resources, Writing – review and editing
Brown, J.Data curation, Investigation, Resources, Writing – review and editing
Moore, L.Conceptualization, Methodology, Writing – review and editing
Simpson, S. A.Conceptualization, Writing – review and editing
Inchley, J. C.Conceptualization, Data curation, Investigation, Methodology, Writing – review and editing
Smith, D. J.Conceptualization, Funding acquisition, Methodology, Supervision, Writing – review and editing
Authors: Lyall, L. M., Sangha, N., Wyse, C., Hindle, E., Haughton, D., Campbell, K., Brown, J., Moore, L., Simpson, S. A., Inchley, J. C., and Smith, D. J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
Journal Name:PLoS ONE
Publisher:Public Library of Science
ISSN:1932-6203
ISSN (Online):1932-6203
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2020 Lyall et al.
First Published:First published in PLoS ONE 15(12): e0242080
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License
Data DOI:10.5525/gla.researchdata.1075

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
302957Mental Health Data PathfinderDaniel SmithMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_PC_17217HW - Mental Health and Wellbeing
173096Investigating comorbidity between hypertension and bipolar disorder to identify new and repurposed medications for bipolar disorderDaniel SmithLister Institute of Preventive Medicine (LISTININ)Research Prize 2016HW - Mental Health and Wellbeing
190877Quinquennial Core FundsLaurence MooreMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_12017/14HW - MRC/CSO SPHSU Support Services
Chief Scientist Office (CSO)SPSHU14