Hypothesis: the highly folded brain surface might be structured and located so as to facilitate inter-brain synchronization

Minnis, H. , Posserud, M.-B., Thompson, L. and Gillberg, C. (2020) Hypothesis: the highly folded brain surface might be structured and located so as to facilitate inter-brain synchronization. Research Ideas and Outcomes, 6, e48887. (doi: 10.3897/rio.6.e48887)

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Abstract

We integrate recent findings from neuro-anatomy, electroencephalography, quantum biology and social/neurodevelopment to propose that the brain surface might be specialised for communication with other brains. Ground breaking, but still small-scale, research has demonstrated that human brains can act in synchrony and detect the brain activity of other human brains. Group aggregation, in all species, maximises community support and safety but does not depend on verbal or visual interaction. The morphology of the brain’s outermost layers, across a wide range of species, exhibits a highly folded fractal structure that is likely to maximise exchange at the surface: in humans, a reduced brain surface area is associated with disorders of social communication. The brain sits in a vulnerable exposed location where it is prone to damage, rather than being housed in a central location such as within the ribcage. These observations have led us to the hypothesis that the brain surface might be specialised for interacting with other brains at its surface, allowing synchronous non-verbal interaction. To our knowledge, this has not previously been proposed or investigated.

Item Type:Articles
Keywords:Brain surface, two-person neuroscience, brain-brain synchrony, quantum biological processes.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Minnis, Professor Helen and Thompson, Dr Lucy and Gillberg, Professor Christopher
Authors: Minnis, H., Posserud, M.-B., Thompson, L., and Gillberg, C.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:Research Ideas and Outcomes
Publisher:Pensoft Publishers
ISSN:2367-7163
ISSN (Online):2367-7163
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2020 Minnis H et al.
First Published:First published in Research Ideas and Outcomes 6: e48887
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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