The cost of prevalent and incident cardiovascular disease in people with type 2 diabetes in Scotland: Data from the Scottish Care Information - Diabetes Collaboration (SCI-Diabetes)

McMeekin, P., Geue, C. , Mocevic, E., Hoxer, C.S., Ochs, A., McGurnaghan, S., Colhoun, H.M., Wild, S.H. and Wu, O. (2020) The cost of prevalent and incident cardiovascular disease in people with type 2 diabetes in Scotland: Data from the Scottish Care Information - Diabetes Collaboration (SCI-Diabetes). Diabetic Medicine, 37(11), pp. 1927-1934. (doi: 10.1111/dme.14253) (PMID:31989661)

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Abstract

Aim: To compare costs for three groups of people with type 2 diabetes, those at high risk of future cardiovascular disease, those without cardiovascular disease and those with established cardiovascular disease, and to also compare costs incurred by people with type 2 diabetes with an incident cardiovascular disease event with those who remain incident event‐free over a 3‐year period. Methods: Data about people with type 2 diabetes in Scotland were obtained from the Scottish Care Information Diabetes registry. Data linkage was used to retrieve information on healthcare utilization, care home use and deaths. Productivity effects were estimated for those of non‐pensionable age. We estimated costs over 12 months (prevalent cardiovascular disease) and 3 years from incident cardiovascular disease event. Results: Mean annual cost per person with established cardiovascular disease was £6900, £3300 for a person at high risk of future cardiovascular disease, and £2500 for a person without cardiovascular disease and not at high risk. In year 1, the cost of an incident cardiovascular disease event was £16 700 compared with £2100 for people without an incident event. Over 2 years, the cumulative costs were £21 500 and £4200, and by year 3, £25 000 and £5900, respectively. Conclusions: Cardiovascular disease in people with type 2 diabetes places a significant financial burden on healthcare and the wider economy. Our results emphasize the financial consequences of cardiovascular disease prevention strategies.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:Funding Sources: This study was funded by an unrestricted educational grant from Novo Nordisk A/S. Programming support for the Scottish Diabetes Research Network is provided by the Chief Scientist Office Scotland.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:McMeekin, Dr Peter and Wu, Professor Olivia and Geue, Dr Claudia
Authors: McMeekin, P., Geue, C., Mocevic, E., Hoxer, C.S., Ochs, A., McGurnaghan, S., Colhoun, H.M., Wild, S.H., and Wu, O.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Health Economics and Health Technology Assessment
Journal Name:Diabetic Medicine
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:0742-3071
ISSN (Online):1464-5491
Published Online:28 January 2020
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2020 Diabetes UK
First Published:First published in Diabetic Medicine 37(11): 1927-1934
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

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