Distinguishing suicide ideation from suicide attempts: further test of the Integrated Motivational-Volitional Model of Suicidal Behaviour

Branley-Bell, D., O'Connor, D. B., Green, J. A., Ferguson, E., O'Carroll, R. E. and O'Connor, R. C. (2019) Distinguishing suicide ideation from suicide attempts: further test of the Integrated Motivational-Volitional Model of Suicidal Behaviour. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 117, pp. 100-107. (doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2019.07.007) (PMID:31376620)

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Abstract

Suicidal behaviour poses a significant public health concern. Research into the factors that distinguish between the emergence of suicide ideation and the enactment of a suicide attempt is crucial. This study tests central tenets of the Integrated Motivational-Volitional Model of suicidal behaviour (IMV, O’Connor and Kirtley, 2018) which posits that volitional phase factors govern the transition from thinking to attempting suicide. 299 adults completed a face-to-face interview and were allocated to groups based on their suicidal history: Suicide attempt group (N = 100), suicide ideation group (N = 105), and a control group (N = 94). Measures were taken at baseline, at 1-month and 6-months follow-up. As predicted, the attempt group differed from the ideation group on all volitional phase factors. Those who had attempted suicide reported higher capability for suicide, were more likely to have a family member or friend who had self-injured or attempted suicide, and were more impulsive. In keeping with the IMV model, the ideation and attempt groups had similar scores on the motivational factors. Defeat and entrapment were significant predictors of ideation at baseline, and mediation analyses indicated that defeat had an indirect effect on ideation through entrapment at baseline and at 1-month follow-up. The results support the IMV model and suggest that entrapment should be routinely included in suicide risk assessments. Further research to test predictors of the transition from suicide ideation to suicide attempts is crucial to inform future intervention development and health care delivery.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This research was supported by a research award from the US Department of Defense (Award No. W81XWH-12-1-0007).
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:O'Connor, Professor Rory and O'Carroll, Prof Ronan
Authors: Branley-Bell, D., O'Connor, D. B., Green, J. A., Ferguson, E., O'Carroll, R. E., and O'Connor, R. C.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:Journal of Psychiatric Research
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0022-3956
ISSN (Online):1879-1379
Published Online:27 July 2019
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd.
First Published:First published in Journal of Psychiatric Research 117: 100-107
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

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