Intermittent exposure of primitive quiescent chronic myeloid leukemia cells to granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in vitro promotes their elimination by imatinib mesylate

Jorgensen, H.G., Copland, M. , Allan, E.K., Jiang, X.Y., Eaves, A., Eaves, C. and Holyoake, T.L. (2006) Intermittent exposure of primitive quiescent chronic myeloid leukemia cells to granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in vitro promotes their elimination by imatinib mesylate. Clinical Cancer Research, 12(2), pp. 626-633. (doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-05-0429)

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Abstract

<p><b>Purpose:</b> Primitive quiescent chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells are biologically resistant to imatinib mesylate, an inhibitor of the p210<sup>BCR-ABL</sup> kinase. The present study was designed to investigate whether either continuous or intermittent exposure of these cells to granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) <i>in vitro</i> can overcome this limitation to the effectiveness of imatinib mesylate therapy.</p> <p><b>Experimental Design:</b> CD34<sup>+</sup> leukemic cells were isolated from six newly diagnosed chronic phase CML patients and cultured for 12 days in serum-free medium with or without G-CSF and/ or imatinib mesylate present either continuously or intermittently (three cycles of G-CSF for 0, 1, or 4 days imatinib mesylate for 0, 3, or 4 days). Every 4 days, the number of residual undivided viable cells and the total number of viable cells present were measured.</p> <p><b>Results:</b> Intermittent but not continuous exposure to G-CSF significantly accelerated the disappearance in vitro of initially quiescent CD34<sup>+</sup> CML cells. This resulted in 3- and 5-fold fewer of these cells remaining after 8 and 12 days, respectively, relative to continuous imatinib mesylate alone (P < 0.04). Cultures containing imatinib mesylate and intermittently added G-CSF also showed the greatest reduction in the total number of cells present after 12 days (5-fold more than imatinib mesylate alone).</p> <p><b>Conclusion:</b> Intermittent exposure to G-CSF can enhance the effect of imatinib mesylate on CML cells by specifically targeting the primitive quiescent leukemic elements. A protocol for treating chronic-phase CML patients with imatinib mesylate that incorporates intermittent G-CSF exposure may offer a novel strategy for obtaining improved responses <i>in vivo</i>.</p>

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Holyoake, Professor Tessa and Allan, Mrs Elaine and Jorgensen, Dr Heather and Copland, Professor Mhairi
Authors: Jorgensen, H.G., Copland, M., Allan, E.K., Jiang, X.Y., Eaves, A., Eaves, C., and Holyoake, T.L.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cancer Sciences
Journal Name:Clinical Cancer Research
Publisher:American Association for Cancer Research
ISSN:1078-0432

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
354131Novel drug combinations for eradication of Ph+/Bcr-Abl+ haemopoietic stem cells in chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML)Mhairi CoplandMedical Research Council (MRC)G84/6317Institute of Cancer Sciences