Physical and physiologic determinants of rock climbing

MacKenzie, R., Monaghan, L., Masson, R. A., Werner, A. K., Caprez, T. S., Johnston, L. and Kemi, O. J. (2020) Physical and physiologic determinants of rock climbing. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 15(2), pp. 168-179. (doi: 10.1123/ijspp.2018-0901) (PMID:31094249)

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Abstract

Purpose: Rock climbing performance relies on many characteristics. Here, we identified the physical and physiologic determinants of peak performance in rock climbing across the range from lower-grade to elite. Methods: 44 male and 33 female climbers with onsight maximal climbing grades 5a-8a and 5a-7b+, respectively, were tested for physical, physiologic and psychologic characteristics (independent variables) that were correlated and modelled by multiple regression and principal component analysis to identify the determinants of rock climbing ability. Results: In males, 23 of 47 variables correlated with climbing ability (p<0.05, Pearson’s correlation coefficients 0.773-0.340), including shoulder endurance, hand and finger strength, shoulder power-endurance, hip flexibility, lower-arm grip strength, shoulder power, upper-arm strength, core-body endurance, upper-body aerobic endurance, hamstrings and lower-back flexibility, aerobic endurance, and open-hand finger strength. In females, 10 of 47 variables correlated with climbing ability (p<0.05, Pearson’s correlation coefficients 0.742-0.482): shoulder endurance and power, lower-arm grip strength, balance, aerobic endurance, and arm span. Principal component analysis and univariate multiple regression identified the main explanatory variables. In both sexes, shoulder power and endurance measured as maximum pull-ups, average arm crank power, and bent-arm hang, emerged as the main determinants (p<0.01; adjusted R2=0.77 in males and 0.62 in females). In males, finger pincer (p=0.07) and grip strength also had trends (p=0.09) toward significant effects. Finally, in test-of-principle training studies, we trained to increase main determinants 42-67%; this improved climbing ability 2-3 grades. Conclusions: Shoulder power and endurance majorly determines maximal climbing. Finger, hand and arm strength, core-body endurance, aerobic endurance, flexibility and balance are important secondary determinants.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Kemi, Dr Ole
Authors: MacKenzie, R., Monaghan, L., Masson, R. A., Werner, A. K., Caprez, T. S., Johnston, L., and Kemi, O. J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Life Sciences
Journal Name:International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Publisher:Human Kinetics
ISSN:1555-0265
ISSN (Online):1555-0273
Published Online:16 May 2019
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2019 Human Kinetics Inc.
First Published:First published in International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance 15(2): 168-179
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

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