Association of fitness and grip-strength with heart failure: findings from the UK Biobank population-based study

Sillars, A. et al. (2019) Association of fitness and grip-strength with heart failure: findings from the UK Biobank population-based study. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 94(11), pp. 2230-2240. (doi: 10.1016/j.mayocp.2019.04.041) (PMID:31685151)

[img] Text
183875.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

1MB

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the associations of objectively measured cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and grip strength (GS) with incident heart failure (HF), a clinical syndrome that results in substantial social and economic burden, using UK Biobank data. Patients and Methods: Of the 502,628 participants recruited into the UK Biobank between April 1, 2007, and December 31, 2010, a total of 374,493 were included in our GS analysis and 57,053 were included in CRF analysis. Associations between CRF and GS and incident HF were investigated using Cox proportional hazard models, with adjustment for known measured confounders. Results: During a mean of 4.1 (range, 2.4-7.1) years, 631 HF events occurred in those with GS data, and 66 HF events occurred in those with CRF data. Higher CRF was associated with 18% lower risk for HF (hazard ratio [HR], 0.82; 95% CI, 0.76-0.88) per 1–metabolic equivalent increment increase and GS was associated with 19% lower incidence of HF risk (HR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.77-0.86) per 5-kg increment increase. When CRF and GS were standardized, the HR for CRF was 0.50 per 1-SD increment (95% CI, 0.38-0.65), and for GS was 0.65 per 1-SD increment (95% CI, 0.58-0.72). Conclusion: Our data indicate that objective measurements of physical function (GS and CRF) are strongly and independently associated with lower HF incidence. Future studies targeting improving CRF and muscle strength should include HF as an outcome to assess whether these results are causal.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Gill, Professor Jason and Ferguson, Dr Lyn and Ho, Dr Frederick and Sillars, Dr Anne and Welsh, Dr Paul and Anderson, Dr Jana and Celis, Dr Carlos and Gray, Dr Stuart and Iliodromiti, Dr Stamatina and Pell, Professor Jill and Mackay, Professor Daniel and Cleland, Professor John and Petermann, Mrs Fanny and Sattar, Professor Naveed and Lyall, Dr Donald and Pellicori, Dr Pierpaolo
Authors: Sillars, A., Celis-Morales, C. A., Ho, F., Petermann, F., Welsh, P., Iliodromiti, S., Ferguson, L. D., Lyall, D. M., Anderson, J., Mackay, D., Pellicori, P., Cleland, J., Pell, J. P., Gill, J. M.R., Gray, S. R., and Sattar, N.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Public Health
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Robertson Centre
Journal Name:Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0025-6196
ISSN (Online):1942-5546
Published Online:01 November 2019
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2019 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research
First Published:First published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings 94(11):2230-2240
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record

Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
172631Women's reproductive health and its relation to diabetes and cardiovascular healthStamatina IliodromitiMedical Research Council (MRC)MR/N015177/1Med - Reproductive and Maternal Medicine
190814BHF centre of excellenceRhian TouyzBritish Heart Foundation (BHF)RE/13/5/30177Institute of Cardiovascular & Medical Sciences