Does Self-Determination Theory help explain the impact of social prescribing? A qualitative analysis of patients’ experiences of the Glasgow ‘Deep-End’ Community Links Worker intervention

Hanlon, P. , Gray, C. M. , Chng, N. R. and Mercer, S. W. (2019) Does Self-Determination Theory help explain the impact of social prescribing? A qualitative analysis of patients’ experiences of the Glasgow ‘Deep-End’ Community Links Worker intervention. Chronic Illness, (doi:10.1177/1742395319845427) (PMID:31053038) (Early Online Publication)

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Abstract

Objectives: The Links Worker Programme is a primary care-based social prescribing initiative in Glasgow, Scotland, targeting patients with complex needs in areas of high socioeconomic deprivation. The programme aims to improve wellbeing by connecting patients to appropriate community resources. This study explored the utility of Self-Determination Theory in understanding the reported impacts of the intervention. Methods: Thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews with 12 patients (34–64 years, six female) referred to Community Links Practitioners using Self-Determination Theory as a framework. Impact was assessed from participants’ description of their personal circumstances before and after interaction with the Community Links Practitioner. Results: Four patients described no overall change in daily life, two described slight improvement and six described moderate or major improvement. Improvers described satisfaction of the three psychological needs identified in Self-Determination Theory: relatedness, competence and autonomy. This often related to greater participation in community activities and sense of competence in social interaction. Patients who benefitted most described a change towards more intrinsic regulation of behaviour following the intervention. Conclusions: Understanding the impact of this social prescribing initiative was facilitated by analysis using Self-Determination Theory. Self-Determination Theory may therefore be a useful theoretical framework for the development and evaluation of new interventions in this setting.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Gray, Professor Cindy and Hanlon, Dr Peter and Mercer, Professor Stewart and Chng, Dr Nai Rui
Authors: Hanlon, P., Gray, C. M., Chng, N. R., and Mercer, S. W.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:Chronic Illness
Publisher:SAGE
ISSN:1742-3953
ISSN (Online):1745-9206
Published Online:03 May 2019
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2019 The Authors
First Published:First published in Chronic Illness 2019
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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