Evidence for localisation of a Theileria parasite AT hook DNA-binding protein to the nucleus of immortalised bovine host cells

Swan, D. G., Phillips, K., Tait, A. and Shiels, B. R. (1999) Evidence for localisation of a Theileria parasite AT hook DNA-binding protein to the nucleus of immortalised bovine host cells. Molecular and Biochemical Parasitology, 101(1-2), pp. 117-129. (doi:10.1016/S0166-6851(99)00064-X) (PMID:10413048)

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Abstract

Immortalisation of bovine leukocytes by the macroschizont stage of the tick transmitted protozoan parasite, Theileria annulata, results in the clonal expansion of infected cells and dissemination throughout the bovine host. The parasite-encoded factors which induce this unique transformation event have not been defined to date. In this study, a gene family (TashAT) has been characterised that encodes polypeptides with homology to known DNA-binding proteins. Expression of TashAT genes occurs at the intracellular macroschizont stage of the parasite life cycle and during differentiation to the merozoite, negative regulation of TashAT genes is detected early relative to other macroschizont genes. Interestingly, the early reduction in TashAT expression coincides with the initial decrease in host cell proliferation. One member of the family, TashAT2, was characterised in detail and the predicted polypeptide sequence was found to harbor three AT hook DNA-binding domains. Antisera generated against two distinct regions of TashAT2 both located the antigen to the host cell nucleus and, combined with protein translation inhibition and immunoprecipitation studies, provide evidence that this polypeptide could be transported from the parasite to this location. Further evidence for this postulation was provided by transfection studies which demonstrated that TashAT2 does encode the structural information required for localisation to the nucleus of a mammalian cell. Thus, TashAT2 is a potential candidate for a parasite-encoded factor that modulates host cell gene expression and may be involved in the control of host cell proliferation.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Shiels, Professor Brian and Tait, Professor Andy
Authors: Swan, D. G., Phillips, K., Tait, A., and Shiels, B. R.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
Journal Name:Molecular and Biochemical Parasitology
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0166-6851
ISSN (Online):1872-9428

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