Suicidal thinking and perfectionism: the role of goal adjustment and behavioral inhibition/activation systems (BIS/BAS)

O’Connor, R. C. and Forgan, G. (2007) Suicidal thinking and perfectionism: the role of goal adjustment and behavioral inhibition/activation systems (BIS/BAS). Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy, 25(4), pp. 321-341. (doi:10.1007/s10942-007-0057-2)

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Abstract

The current study investigated the associations among perfectionism, goal adjustment, behavioral activation sensitivity (BAS), behavioral inhibition sensitivity (BIS), and suicidal thinking. Participants (n = 255) completed the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, the BIS/BAS scale, the Goal Adjustment scale, and a measure of suicidal thinking. The findings showed that socially prescribed perfectionism was the only perfectionism dimension associated with suicidal thinking. Goal reengagement (but not goal disengagement) is an important construct in the suicidal process. A series of hierarchical regression analyses showed that goal reengagement moderates and mediates the effect of socially prescribed perfectionism on suicidal thinking. BIS was also associated with suicidal behavior but its effect was mediated via socially prescribed perfectionism. The theoretical and treatment implications of the relationships between socially prescribed perfectionism, goal reengagement, and suicidal thinking and between BIS, socially prescribed perfectionism, and suicidal thinking are discussed. Future research is required to determine whether these relationships are predictive of suicidal thinking and behavior over time.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:O'Connor, Professor Rory
Authors: O’Connor, R. C., and Forgan, G.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0894-9085
ISSN (Online):1573-6563
Published Online:12 July 2007

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