Use of olfactory ensheathing cells as candidates for transplant-mediated repair of central nervous system lesions

Barnett, S. C. (2003) Use of olfactory ensheathing cells as candidates for transplant-mediated repair of central nervous system lesions. In: Sticherling, M. and Christophers, E. (eds.) Treatment of Autoimmune Disorders. Springer Vienna, pp. 19-27. ISBN 9783709172889 (doi:10.1007/978-3-7091-6016-9_3)

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Abstract

The rat olfactory system is a tissue of extreme interest. It has the capacity to support axonal outgrowth throughout the life of the animal and more specifically can maintain continual growth of olfactory axons during natural turnover and also after injury. These newly generated neurons originate from stem cells present in the olfactory epithelium and extend axons which can penetrate into the adult central nervous system (CNS) tissue and resynapse with the second-order axons present at the glomerolus in the olfactory bulb (Doucette 1984, Farbman 1990, Raisman 1985). It is thought that this property is in part due to the specialized glial cells that ensheath the olfactory neurons and reside in the olfactory bulb and nerve known as olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) (Fig. 1).

Item Type:Book Sections
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Barnett, Professor Susan
Authors: Barnett, S. C.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
Publisher:Springer Vienna
ISBN:9783709172889

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