Resting state connectivity and cognitive performance in adults with cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy

Cullen, B. , Moreton, F. C., Stringer, M. S., Krishnadas, R., Kalladka, D., López-González, M. R., Santosh, C., Schwarzbauer, C. and Muir, K. W. (2016) Resting state connectivity and cognitive performance in adults with cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 36(5), pp. 981-991. (doi:10.1177/0271678X16636395) (PMID:26929239)

[img]
Preview
Text
115785.pdf - Accepted Version

772kB

Abstract

Cognitive impairment is an inevitable feature of cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), affecting executive function, attention and processing speed from an early stage. Impairment is associated with structural markers such as lacunes, but associations with functional connectivity have not yet been reported. Twenty-two adults with genetically-confirmed CADASIL (11 male; aged 49.8 ± 11.2 years) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging at rest. Intrinsic attentional/executive networks were identified using group independent components analysis. A linear regression model tested voxel-wise associations between cognitive measures and component spatial maps, and Pearson correlations were performed with mean intra-component connectivity z-scores. Two frontoparietal components were associated with cognitive performance. Voxel-wise analyses showed an association between one component cluster and processing speed (left middle temporal gyrus; peak −48, −18, −14; ZE = 5.65, pFWEcorr = 0.001). Mean connectivity in both components correlated with processing speed (r = 0.45, p = 0.043; r = 0.56, p = 0.008). Mean connectivity in one component correlated with faster Trailmaking B minus A time (r = −0.77, p < 0.001) and better executive performance (r = 0.56, p = 0.011). This preliminary study provides evidence for associations between cognitive performance and attentional network connectivity in CADASIL. Functional connectivity may be a useful biomarker of cognitive performance in this population.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Cullen, Dr Breda and Moreton, Dr Fiona and Santosh, Dr Celestine and Krishnadas, Dr Rajeev and Muir, Professor Keith and Kalladka, Dr Dheeraj
Authors: Cullen, B., Moreton, F. C., Stringer, M. S., Krishnadas, R., Kalladka, D., López-González, M. R., Santosh, C., Schwarzbauer, C., and Muir, K. W.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
Publisher:SAGE
ISSN:0271-678X
ISSN (Online):1559-7016
Published Online:29 February 2016
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2016 The Authors
First Published:First published in Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism 36(5): 981-991
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record