Having a family doctor is associated with some better patient-reported outcomes of primary care consultations

Lam, C. L.K., Yu, E. Y.T., Lo, Y. Y.C., Wong, C. K.H., Mercer, S. M., Fong, D. Y.T., Lee, A., Lam, T. P. and Leung, G. M. (2014) Having a family doctor is associated with some better patient-reported outcomes of primary care consultations. Frontiers in Medicine, 1(Art 29), pp. 1-8. (doi:10.3389/fmed.2014.00029)

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Abstract

Background Hong Kong (HK) has pluralistic primary care that is provided by a variety of doctors. The aim of our study was to assess patient-reported outcomes of primary care consultations in HK and whether having a family doctor (FD) made any difference.

Methods We interviewed by telephone 3148 subjects from 5174 contacted households (response rate 60.8%) randomly selected from the general population of HK about the experience of their last primary care consultations in September 2007 and April 2008. We compared the patient-reported outcomes (PRO) and patient-centered process of care in those with a FD, those with other types of regular primary care doctors (ORD) and those without any regular primary care doctor (NRD). PRO included patient enablement, global improvement in health, overall satisfaction, and likelihood of recommending their doctors to family and friends. Patient-centered process of care indicators was explanations about the illness, and address of patient’s concerns.

Results One thousand one hundred fifty, 746, and 1157 reported to have FD, ORD, and NRD, respectively. Over 80% of those with FD consulted their usual primary care doctors in the last consultation compared with 27% of those with NRD. Compared with subjects having ORD or NRD, subjects with FD reported being more enabled after the consultation and were more likely to recommend their doctors to family and friends. Subjects with FD and ORD were more likely than those having NRD to report a global improvement in health and satisfaction. FD group was more likely than the other two groups to report receiving an explanation on the diagnosis, nature, and expected course of the illness, and having their concerns addressed. Patient enablement was associated with explanation of diagnosis, nature, and expected course of illness, and address of patient’s concerns.

Conclusion People with a regular FD were more likely to feel being enabled and to experience patient-centered care in consultations.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Mercer, Professor Stewart
Authors: Lam, C. L.K., Yu, E. Y.T., Lo, Y. Y.C., Wong, C. K.H., Mercer, S. M., Fong, D. Y.T., Lee, A., Lam, T. P., and Leung, G. M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
Journal Name:Frontiers in Medicine
Publisher:Frontiers Research Foundation
ISSN:2296-858X
ISSN (Online):2296-858X
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2014 The Authors
First Published:First published in Frontiers in Medicine 1(Art 29):1-8
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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