Diagnostic thinking processes: evidence from a constructive interaction study of electrocardiogram (ECG) interpretation

Simpson, S.A. and Gilhooly, K.J. (1997) Diagnostic thinking processes: evidence from a constructive interaction study of electrocardiogram (ECG) interpretation. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 11(6), pp. 543-554. (doi:10.1002/(sici)1099-0720(199712)11:6<543::aid-acp486>3.0.co;2-c)

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Abstract

This paper examines the use of different types of knowledge at different levels of expertise in the domain of electrocardiogram (ECG) interpretation. Analyses of constructive interaction protocols from expert, novice and intermediate subjects working in same-skill pairs on six ECG traces indicated that: novice and intermediate pairs produced proportionately more trace characterizing statements than the other groups; expert pairs produced proportionately more clinical hypothesis statements and proportionately fewer but more complex biomedical inference statements than the other groups.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Simpson, Professor Sharon
Authors: Simpson, S.A., and Gilhooly, K.J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO Unit
Journal Name:Applied Cognitive Psychology
Publisher:John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
ISSN:0888-4080
ISSN (Online):1099-0720

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