Recovery from Rapamycin: drug-insensitive activity of yeast target of rapamycin complex 1 (torc1) supports residual proliferation that dilutes rapamycin among progeny cells

Evans, S., Burgess, K. E.V. and Gray, J. V. (2014) Recovery from Rapamycin: drug-insensitive activity of yeast target of rapamycin complex 1 (torc1) supports residual proliferation that dilutes rapamycin among progeny cells. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 289(38), pp. 26554-26565. (doi:10.1074/jbc.M114.589754) (PMID:25104356) (PMCID:PMC4176226)

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Abstract

The target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is a key conserved regulator of eukaryotic cell growth. The xenobiotic rapamycin is a potent inhibitor of the yeast complex. Surprisingly, the EGO complex, a nonessential in vivo activator of TORC1, is somehow required for yeast cells to recover efficiently from a period of treatment with rapamycin. Why? Here, we found that rapamycin is only a partial inhibitor of TORC1. We confirmed that saturating amounts of rapamycin do not fully inhibit proliferation of wild-type cells, and we found that the residual proliferation in the presence of the drug is dependent on the EGO complex and on the activity of TORC1. We found that this residual TORC1-dependent proliferation is key to recovery from rapamycin treatment. First, the residual proliferation rate correlates with the ability of cells to recover from treatment. Second, the residual proliferation rate persists long after washout of the drug and until cells recover. Third, the total observable pool of cell-associated rapamycin is extremely stable and decreases only with increasing cell number after washout of the drug. Finally, consideration of the residual proliferation rate alone accurately and quantitatively accounts for the kinetics of recovery of wild-type cells and for the nature and severity of the ego− mutant defect. Overall, our results revealed that rapamycin is a partial inhibitor of yeast TORC1, that persistence of the drug limits recovery, and that rapamycin is not detoxified by yeast but is passively diluted among progeny cells because of residual proliferation.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Gray, Dr Joseph and Burgess, Dr Karl
Authors: Evans, S., Burgess, K. E.V., and Gray, J. V.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Life Sciences
Journal Name:Journal of Biological Chemistry
Publisher:American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
ISSN:0021-9258
ISSN (Online):1083-351X

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
620261Metabolomic characterisation of clinical biofilms: monitoring of their formation and dispersal on different nanoscale patterned surfaces (ISSF Catalyst)Karl BurgessWellcome Trust (WELLCOME)097821/Z/11/ZIII - PARASITOLOGY