Contrasting effects of acute and chronic gastro-intestinal helminth infections on a heterologous immune response in a transgenic adoptive transfer model

Boitelle, A., Di Lorenzo, C., Scales, H.E. , Devaney, E., Kennedy, M.W., Garside, P. and Lawrence, C.E. (2005) Contrasting effects of acute and chronic gastro-intestinal helminth infections on a heterologous immune response in a transgenic adoptive transfer model. International Journal for Parasitology, 35(7), pp. 765-775. (doi:10.1016/j.ijpara.2005.02.013) (PMID:15893319)

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Abstract

We have previously found that co-immunisation with ovalbumin (OVA) and the body fluid of the helminth Ascaris suum inhibited an OVA-specific delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response by reducing OVA-specific CD4+ T lymphocyte proliferation via an IL-4 independent mechanism. In the present study, we determined whether parasite infections themselves could induce similar changes to peripheral immunisation by examining the modulation of OVA-specific immune responses during acute and chronic helminth infections. Surprisingly, an acute infection with Trichinella spiralis, but not a chronic infection with Heligmosomoides polygyrus, inhibited the OVA-specific DTH reaction. Correspondingly, the T helper 1 (Th1) OVA-specific response was decreased in mice infected with T. spiralis, but not with H. polygyrus. Inhibition of the Th1 response may be a result of a shift in the Th1/Th2 balance as although both H. polygyrus and T. spiralis infected mice induced a Th2 OVA-specific response, that exhibited by T. spiralis was more potent. Furthermore, although IL-10 secretion upon OVA restimulation was similarly increased by both infections, production of this immunoregulatory cytokine may play a role in the suppression of immune responses observed with T. spiralis infection depending on the context of its release. Interestingly, analysis of the OVA-specific T lymphocyte division by carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) staining revealed that gastro-intestinal infection with the acute helminth T. spiralis, but not with chronic H. polygyrus, inhibited the systemic immune response by significantly inhibiting the antigen-specific T cell proliferation during the primary response, a mechanism similar to that observed when A. suum parasite extracts were directly mixed with the OVA during immunisation in our previous studies.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Devaney, Professor Eileen and Garside, Professor Paul and Scales, Dr Hannah
Authors: Boitelle, A., Di Lorenzo, C., Scales, H.E., Devaney, E., Kennedy, M.W., Garside, P., and Lawrence, C.E.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Life Sciences
Journal Name:International Journal for Parasitology
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0020-7519
ISSN (Online):1879-0135
Published Online:18 April 2005

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