Weight trajectories through infancy and childhood and risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in adolescence: the ALSPAC study

Anderson, E. L., Howe, L. D., Fraser, A., Callaway, M. P., Sattar, N. , Day, C., Tilling, K. and Lawlor, D. A. (2014) Weight trajectories through infancy and childhood and risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in adolescence: the ALSPAC study. Journal of Hepatology, 61(3), pp. 626-632. (doi: 10.1016/j.jhep.2014.04.018)

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Abstract

Background and Aims: Adiposity is a key risk factor for NAFLD. Few studies have examined prospective associations of infant and childhood adiposity with subsequent NAFLD risk. We examined associations of weight-for-height trajectories from birth to age 10 with liver outcomes in adolescence, and assessed the extent to which associations are mediated through fat mass at the time of outcome assessment.<p></p> Methods: Individual trajectories of weight and height were estimated for participants in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children using random-effects linear-spline models. Associations of birthweight (adjusted for birth length) and weight change (adjusted for length/height change) from 0–3 months, 3 months–1 y, 1–3 y, 3–7 y, and 7–10 y with ultrasound scan (USS) determined liver fat and stiffness, and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) at mean age 17.8 y were assessed with linear and logistic regressions. Mediation by concurrent fat mass was assessed with adjustment for fat mass at mean age 17.8 y.<p></p> Results: Birth weight was positively associated with liver stiffness and negatively with ALT and AST. Weight change from birth to 1 y was not associated with outcomes. Weight change from 1–3 y, 3–7 y, and 7–10 y was consistently positively associated with USS and blood-based liver outcomes. Adjusting for fat mass at mean age 17.8 y attenuated associations toward the null, suggesting associations are largely mediated by concurrent body fatness.<p></p> Conclusions: Greater rates of weight-for-height change between 1 y and 10 y are consistently associated with adverse liver outcomes in adolescence. These associations are largely mediated through concurrent fatness.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Sattar, Professor Naveed
Authors: Anderson, E. L., Howe, L. D., Fraser, A., Callaway, M. P., Sattar, N., Day, C., Tilling, K., and Lawlor, D. A.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
Journal Name:Journal of Hepatology
Publisher:Elsevier B.V.
ISSN:0168-8278
ISSN (Online):1600-0641
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2014 European Association for the Study of the Liver
First Published:First published in the Journal of Hepatology 61(3):626-632
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
565111Modifiable early life determinants of adolescent NAFLD and its association with metabolic and vascular traitsNaveed SattarBritish Heart Foundation (BHF)PG/11/33/28794RI CARDIOVASCULAR & MEDICAL SCIENCES