Intrinsic emotional relevance of outcomes and prediction error: their influence on early processing of subsequent stimulus during reversal learning

Nahum, L., Barcellona-Lehmann, S., Morand, S. , Sander, D. and Schnider, A. (2012) Intrinsic emotional relevance of outcomes and prediction error: their influence on early processing of subsequent stimulus during reversal learning. Journal of Psychophysiology, 26(1), pp. 42-50.

Full text not currently available from Enlighten.

Publisher's URL: http://web.a.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.lib.gla.ac.uk/ehost/detail/detail?vid=2&sid=922c584c-3d9a-4fd7-9ea3-2a1abf590fa6%40sessionmgr4002&hid=4201&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=pdh&AN=2012-03642-005

Abstract

Infrequent events, such as unexpected absence of outcomes (prediction errors), have a detrimental effect on performance of subsequent trial in various cognitive tasks. In the present event-related potential study, we tested whether the influence of prediction error manifests itself in the early cortical processing of subsequent stimuli. Participants performed a reversal learning task in which they saw two alternating pairs of faces and indicated for each pair which one would have a declared target stimulus on its nose. The target switched to the other face after several consecutive trials with correct response, thereby inducing a prediction error, with the switch being indicated by the appearance of a disk (unexpected neutral outcome) or a spider (unexpected unpleasant outcome), depending on the condition. Results showed that after both unexpected and expected unpleasant outcomes, the amplitude of P2 decreased, while after both unexpected neutral and unpleasant outcomes, the amplitude of P1 increased on the following presentation of the pair of faces. Source localization analysis suggested that the differences mainly emanated from the cuneus and precuneus with respect to the P1 and P2 time ranges respectively. We conclude that both the intrinsic emotional relevance of outcomes and prediction error may modulate attention allocation.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Morand, Dr Stephanie
Authors: Nahum, L., Barcellona-Lehmann, S., Morand, S., Sander, D., and Schnider, A.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology
Journal Name:Journal of Psychophysiology
Publisher:Hogrefe Publishing
ISSN:0269-8803
ISSN (Online):2151-2124

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record