Forest grazing and seaweed foddering: early Neolithic occupation at Maybole, South Ayrshire

Becket, A., MacGregor, G., Clarke, A., Duffy, P., Finlay, N. , Miller, J. and Sheridan, A. (2009) Forest grazing and seaweed foddering: early Neolithic occupation at Maybole, South Ayrshire. Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, 139, pp. 105-122.

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Abstract

A group of Early Neolithic features, probably related to the cooking of food, was excavated by Glasgow University Archaeological Research Division (GUARD) near Maybole, South Ayrshire. Particularly significant was the wide range of finds that had been deposited within some of the features, including carbonised ovicaprid (probably goat), faecal pellets, a fragment of a Group VI Great Langdale stone axehead, burnt human bone, a fragmented cylindrical stone object, an assemblage of struck lithics (including pitchstone), and an assemblage of Carinated Bowl pottery. Several features also contained considerable amounts and varieties of carbonised botanical remains, providing a broader insight into the landscape where these features were found. Analysis of these remains suggests that there had been a short phase of occupation, radiocarbon dated to 3780–3650 cal bc.

Item Type:Articles (Other)
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:MacGregor, Dr Gavin and Miller, Dr Jennifer and Finlay, Dr Nyree and Duffy, Mr Paul and Becket, Mr Alastair
Authors: Becket, A., MacGregor, G., Clarke, A., Duffy, P., Finlay, N., Miller, J., and Sheridan, A.
Subjects:C Auxiliary Sciences of History > CC Archaeology
College/School:College of Arts > School of Humanities > Archaeology
Journal Name:Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland
Publisher:Society of Antiquaries of Scotland
ISSN:0081-1564

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