Perceptions of self, significant others, and teacher–child relationships in indiscriminately friendly children

Vervoort, E., Bosmans, G., Doumen, S., Minnis, H. and Verschueren, K. (2014) Perceptions of self, significant others, and teacher–child relationships in indiscriminately friendly children. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 35(11), pp. 2802-2811. (doi:10.1016/j.ridd.2014.07.004)

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Abstract

Objective: Despite increasing research on indiscriminate friendliness in children, almost no research exists on social-cognitive deficits that are supposed to underlie indiscriminately friendly behavior. In this study, we compared indiscriminately friendly children with controls regarding their perceptions of self, reliability trust in significant others, and perceptions of the teacher–child relationship.<p></p> Method: Children's perceptions were compared in two samples: a sample of 33 likely cases for disinhibited reactive attachment disorder (RAD) from special education for children with emotional and behavioral disorders (75.76% boys, Mage = 8.52, 96.9% Caucasian, 33.3% and 45.5% of their mothers completed primary or secondary education, respectively) was matched on sex, age, and socio-economic status with a sample of 33 controls from general education. Children participated individually in several interviews assessing global and social self-concept, reliability trust in significant others, teacher–child relationship perceptions, and vocabulary. Parents and teachers completed a screening questionnaire for RAD and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire.<p></p> Results: Likely disinhibited RAD-cases showed more indiscriminate friendliness and more problem behavior in general according to their parents and teachers than controls. Furthermore, likely RAD-cases reported a more positive global self-concept, more reliability trust in significant others, and more dependency in the teacher–child relationship than controls.<p></p> Conclusions: The results are in line with clinical observations of indiscriminately friendly children and findings in clinical samples of maltreated or attachment disrupted children but contrast hypotheses from developmental attachment research. Further research is needed to explain the more positive perceptions of indiscriminately friendly children.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Minnis, Professor Helen
Authors: Vervoort, E., Bosmans, G., Doumen, S., Minnis, H., and Verschueren, K.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:Research in Developmental Disabilities
Publisher:Elsevier Ltd.
ISSN:0891-4222
ISSN (Online):1873-3379

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