A substance P antagonist, RP-67,580, ameliorates a mouse meningoencephalitic response to Trypanosoma brucei brucei

Kennedy, P. G. E., Rodgers, J. , Jennings, F. W., Murray, M., Leeman, S. E. and Burke, J. M. (1997) A substance P antagonist, RP-67,580, ameliorates a mouse meningoencephalitic response to Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 94(8), pp. 4167-4170.

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Publisher's URL: http://www.pnas.org/content/94/8/4167.abstract

Abstract

Mice infected with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei brucei and treated subcuratively with the trypanocidal drug diminazene aceturate develop an acute inflammatory meningoencephalitis with associated astrocytic proliferation. This reaction is very similar to that seen in the fatal posttreatment reactive encephalopathies that can occur in human African trypanosomiasis. The 11-amino acid neuropeptide substance P (SP) has recently been identified as a mediator in many inflammatory responses, and the development of potent, highly specific, nonpeptide SP antagonists has provided a new opportunity to investigate the possible involvement of SP in a variety of pathological conditions. We therefore postulated that SP may play a role in the development of the posttreatment inflammatory encephalopathy found in this experimental mouse model of African trypanosomiasis. In the present study RP-67,580, a SP antagonist that binds specifically to NK-1 receptors, was given intraperitoneally at a dose of 2 mg/kg twice daily to mice in which a severe meningoencephalitis had been produced. A significant reduction in both the severity of the inflammatory response (P = 0.0001) as well as the degree of astrocyte activation (P < 0.001) was found in the brains of these animals as compared with control mice that had not received RP-67,580. An inactive enantiomer of this SP antagonist, RP-68,651, had no effect on the central nervous system inflammatory reaction. We conclude from these findings that the neuropeptide SP plays a key role in the development of the severe central nervous system inflammatory response associated with African trypanosomiasis.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Kennedy, Professor Peter and Murray, Professor Maxwell and Burke, Dr Joanne and Rodgers, Dr Jean
Authors: Kennedy, P. G. E., Rodgers, J., Jennings, F. W., Murray, M., Leeman, S. E., and Burke, J. M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
Journal Name:Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Publisher:National Academy of Sciences
ISSN:0027-8424
ISSN (Online):1091-6490

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