Cultured human neural cells accumulate a heat-shock protein during acute herpes simplex virus infection

Kennedy, P.G.E., LaThangue, N.B., Chan, W.L. and Clements, G.B. (1985) Cultured human neural cells accumulate a heat-shock protein during acute herpes simplex virus infection. Neuroscience Letters, 61(3), pp. 321-326. (doi:10.1016/0304-3940(85)90484-7)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0304-3940(85)90484-7

Abstract

Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infection of cultured human neural cells causes the accumulation of a host cell-encoded nuclear protein identified as a 57,000 mol.wt. stress protein by monoclonal antibody TI56. This protein is cell cycle-related in fibroblasts, may mediate host cell control during HSV infection and could play a role in the regulation of HSV latency.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Kennedy, Professor Peter
Authors: Kennedy, P.G.E., LaThangue, N.B., Chan, W.L., and Clements, G.B.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
Journal Name:Neuroscience Letters
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0304-3940
ISSN (Online):1872-7972

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