Monitoring health in people with intellectual disabilities: some implications for the integration of health and social care

Willis, D. (2014) Monitoring health in people with intellectual disabilities: some implications for the integration of health and social care. In: Fourth International IASSIDD Europe Regional Congress, Vienna, Austria, 14-17 Jul 2014, p. 392. (doi:10.1111/jar.12096)

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Publisher's URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jar.12096/pdf

Abstract

Aim: The aim of the study was to explore the role of family- and paid-carers in meeting the health needs of people with intellectual disabilities (ID).<p></p> Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with three family-carers and ten paid-carers who supported people with ID. Interview topics looked at roles and different aspects of health. Thematic analysis was undertaken.<p></p> Results: Roles were undefined, leading to difficulty in deciphering who was responsible for the healthcare of the people they supported. Some paid-carers claimed that health was not their remit. The difficulty of monitoring health problems was noted, and carers disclosed skills and techniques to explain health messages to persons with ID.Changes in the living circumstances of persons with ID have seen responsibility for their health become the provenance of paidand family-carers.<p></p>Conclusion: If the health goals of persons with ID are to be met, a more consistent approach to health care within the community setting is needed. This may mean a less than smooth integration of health and social care services.

Item Type:Conference Proceedings
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Willis, Dr Diane
Authors: Willis, D.
Subjects:R Medicine > RT Nursing
R Medicine > RZ Other systems of medicine
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Nursing and Health Care

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