A comparative analysis of the neuroprotective properties of competitive and uncompetitive n-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists in vivo: Implications for the process of excitotoxic degeneration and its therapy

Massieu, L., Thedinga, K.H., McVey, M. and Fagg, G.E. (1993) A comparative analysis of the neuroprotective properties of competitive and uncompetitive n-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists in vivo: Implications for the process of excitotoxic degeneration and its therapy. Neuroscience, 55(4), pp. 883-892. (doi:10.1016/0306-4522(93)90305-Y)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0306-4522(93)90305-Y

Abstract

Injection of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor agonist, quinolinic acid, into the rat striatum in vivo results in the degeneration of cholinergic and GABAergic neurons, as determined seven days later using the marker enzymes, choline acetyltransferase and glutamate decarboxylase, respectively. Such damage was dose-dependently prevented by CGP 37849 or MK-801 (competitive and uncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists, respectively) administered systemically or intrastriatally at the same time as quinolinic acid.

The neuroprotective activity of CGP 37849 was associated with thed-enantiomer, CGP 40116 (ED507.5 mg/kg i.p.), which was approximately 1.5-fold and 3.5-fold more potent than the related compounds,d-CPPene and CGS 19755, respectively. CGP 37849 was a weaker neuroprotectant than MK-801 (ED500.8mg/kg i.p) when administered systemically, but was dramatically more potent following coinjection with quinolinic acid (Ed50'S 0.2 and 117 nmol, respectively). When injected intrastriatally 0.5–2 h post-quinolinic acid, CGP 37849 was protective over the entire period studied, whereas MK-801 was less effective at all post-quinolinic acid injection times. The finding that CGP 37849 is neuroprotective when administered intrastriatally 1–2 h post-quinolinic acid supports the hypothesis that a period exists following excitotoxic insult in which neurons are not committed to die, and can be rescued by blockade of ongoing. N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor activation.

Competition studies indicated that, when coinjected with 100–400 nmol quinolinic acid into the striatum, CGP 37849 exhibited kinetics predicted of a competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist (declining neuroprotective potency with increasing doses of agonist), whereas MK-801 displayed a complex picture, with weak protective activity at low doses of quinolinic acid. Following systemic administration, neither antagonist was markedly affected by the dose of excitotoxin. When given i.p. at up to 6 h post-quinolinic acid, CGP 37849 and MK-801 showed essentially identical profiles of post-insult protection; degeneration of cholinergic neurons was reduced significantly throughout the entire post-insult period, whereas GABAergic neurons were protected only when drugs were administered 2 h or earlier post-quinolinic acid.

The data indicate that competitive and uncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists are effective neuroprotectants in vivo, and that parameters such as drug lipophilicity or mechanism of action at the receptor do not impinge upon their properties as systemically active cerebroprotectants.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:McVey, Dr Mary
Authors: Massieu, L., Thedinga, K.H., McVey, M., and Fagg, G.E.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Life Sciences
Journal Name:Neuroscience
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0306-4522
ISSN (Online):1873-7544

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