The influence of socioeconomic deprivation on multimorbidity at different ages: a cross-sectional study

McLean, G., Gunn, J., Wyke, S., Guthrie, B., Watt, G. C.M., Blane, D. N. and Mercer, S. W. (2014) The influence of socioeconomic deprivation on multimorbidity at different ages: a cross-sectional study. British Journal of General Practice, 64(624), e440-e447. (doi:10.3399/bjgp14X680545) (PMID:24982497) (PMCID:PMC4073730)

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Abstract

Background Multimorbidity occurs at a younger age in individuals in areas of high socioeconomic deprivation but little is known about the 'typology' of multimorbidity in different age groups and its association with socioeconomic status.

Aim To characterise multimorbidity type and most common conditions in a large nationally representative primary care dataset in terms of age and deprivation.

Design and setting Cross-sectional analysis of 1 272 685 adults in Scotland.

Method Multimorbidity type of participants (physical-only, mental-only, mixed physical, and mental) and most common conditions were analysed according to age and deprivation.

Results Multimorbidity increased with age, ranging from 8.1% in those aged 25–34 to 76.1% for those aged ≥75 years. Physical-only (56% of all multimorbidity) was the most common type of multimorbidity in those aged ≥55 years, and did not vary substantially with deprivation. Mental-only was uncommon (4% of all multimorbidity), whereas mixed physical and mental (40% of all multimorbidity) was the most common type of multimorbidity in those aged <55 years and was two- to threefold more common in the most deprived compared with the least deprived in most age groups. Ten conditions (seven physical and three mental) accounted for the top five most common conditions in people with multimorbidity in all age groups. Depression and pain featured in the top five conditions across all age groups. Deprivation was associated with a higher prevalence of depression, drugs misuse, anxiety, dyspepsia, pain, coronary heart disease, and diabetes in multimorbid patients at different ages.

Conclusion Mixed physical and mental multimorbidity is common across the life-span and is exacerbated by deprivation from early adulthood onwards.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Blane, Dr David and Wyke, Professor Sally and McLean, Dr Gary and Mercer, Professor Stewart and Watt, Professor Graham and Gunn, Professor Jane and Guthrie, Prof Bruce
Authors: McLean, G., Gunn, J., Wyke, S., Guthrie, B., Watt, G. C.M., Blane, D. N., and Mercer, S. W.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Social Scientists working in Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:British Journal of General Practice
Publisher:Royal College of General Practitioners
ISSN:0960-1643
ISSN (Online):1478-5242
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2014 British Journal of General Practice
First Published:First published in the British Journal of General Practice 64(624):e440-e447
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
477971Living Well with Multiple MorbidityStewart MercerScottish Executive Health Department (SEHHD-CSO)ARPG/07/01IHW - GENERAL PRACTICE & PRIMARY CARE