The transfer of IgA from mucus to plasma and the implications for diagnosis and control of nematode infections

Prada Jiménez de Cisneros, J., Matthews, L. , Mair, C. , Stefan, T. and Stear, M. J. (2014) The transfer of IgA from mucus to plasma and the implications for diagnosis and control of nematode infections. Parasitology, 141(7), pp. 875-879. (doi:10.1017/S0031182013002321)

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Abstract

Immunoglobulin A (IgA) activity has been associated with reduced growth and fecundity of Teladorsagia circumcincta. IgA is active at the site of infection in the abomasal mucus. However, while IgA activity in abomasal mucus is not easily measured in live animals without invasive methods, IgA activity can be readily detected in the plasma, making it a potentially valuable tool in diagnosis and control. We used a Bayesian statistical analysis to quantify the relationship between mucosal and plasma IgA in sheep deliberately infected with T. circumcincta. The transfer of IgA depends on mucosal IgA activity as well as its interaction with worm number and size; together these account for over 80% of the variation in plasma IgA activity. By quantifying the impact of mucosal IgA and worm number and size on plasma IgA, we provide a tool that can allow more meaningful interpretation of plasma IgA measurements and aid the development of efficient control programmes.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Prada Jimenez de Cisneros, Dr Joaquin and Stefan, Mr Thorsten and Stear, Professor Michael and Matthews, Professor Louise and Mair, Miss Colette
Authors: Prada Jiménez de Cisneros, J., Matthews, L., Mair, C., Stefan, T., and Stear, M. J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
Journal Name:Parasitology
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISSN:0031-1820
ISSN (Online):1469-8161
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2014 Cambridge University Press
First Published:First published in Parasitology 141(7):875-879
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher
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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
536761Why some hosts have high parasite burdens and the implications for the design of sustainable control strategiesLouise MatthewsWellcome Trust (WELLCOME)091717/Z/10/ZRI BIODIVERSITY ANIMAL HEALTH & COMPMED