Insertional mutagenesis and deep profiling reveals gene hierarchies and a Myc/p53-dependent bottleneck in lymphomagenesis

Huser, C. A. et al. (2014) Insertional mutagenesis and deep profiling reveals gene hierarchies and a Myc/p53-dependent bottleneck in lymphomagenesis. PLoS Genetics, 10(2), e1004167. (doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1004167) (PMID:24586197) (PMCID:PMC3937229)

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Abstract

Retroviral insertional mutagenesis (RIM) is a powerful tool for cancer genomics that was combined in this study with deep sequencing (RIM/DS) to facilitate a comprehensive analysis of lymphoma progression. Transgenic mice expressing two potent collaborating oncogenes in the germ line (CD2-MYC, -Runx2) develop rapid onset tumours that can be accelerated and rendered polyclonal by neonatal Moloney murine leukaemia virus (MoMLV) infection. RIM/DS analysis of 28 polyclonal lymphomas identified 771 common insertion sites (CISs) defining a ‘progression network’ that encompassed a remarkably large fraction of known MoMLV target genes, with further strong indications of oncogenic selection above the background of MoMLV integration preference. Progression driven by RIM was characterised as a Darwinian process of clonal competition engaging proliferation control networks downstream of cytokine and T-cell receptor signalling. Enhancer mode activation accounted for the most efficiently selected CIS target genes, including Ccr7 as the most prominent of a set of chemokine receptors driving paracrine growth stimulation and lymphoma dissemination. Another large target gene subset including candidate tumour suppressors was disrupted by intragenic insertions. A second RIM/DS screen comparing lymphomas of wild-type and parental transgenics showed that CD2-MYC tumours are virtually dependent on activation of Runx family genes in strong preference to other potent Myc collaborating genes (Gfi1, Notch1). Ikzf1 was identified as a novel collaborating gene for Runx2 and illustrated the interface between integration preference and oncogenic selection. Lymphoma target genes for MoMLV can be classified into (a) a small set of master regulators that confer self-renewal; overcoming p53 and other failsafe pathways and (b) a large group of progression genes that control autonomous proliferation in transformed cells. These findings provide insights into retroviral biology, human cancer genetics and the safety of vector-mediated gene therapy.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Cameron, Professor Ewan and Neil, Professor James and Bell, Mrs Margaret and Herzyk, Dr Pawel and Kilbey, Dr Anna and Huser, Dr Camille and Borland, Dr Gillian and Gilroy, Dr Kathryn
Authors: Huser, C. A., Gilroy, K. L., de Ridder, J., Kilbey, A., Borland, G., Mackay, N., Jenkins, A., Bell, M., Herzyk, P., van der Weyden, L., Adams, D. J., Rust, A. G., Cameron, E., and Neil, J. C.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Molecular Cell and Systems Biology
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
Journal Name:PLoS Genetics
Publisher:Public Library of Science
ISSN:1553-7404
ISSN (Online):1553-7404
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2014 The Authors
First Published:First published in PLoS Genetics 10(2):e1004167
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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