Integrating the surveillance of animal health, foodborne pathogens and foodborne diseases in developing and in-transition countries

de Balogh, K., Halliday, J. and Lubroth, J. (2013) Integrating the surveillance of animal health, foodborne pathogens and foodborne diseases in developing and in-transition countries. Revue scientifique et technique (International Office of Epizootics), 32(2), pp. 539-548.

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Publisher's URL: http://www.oie.int/doc/ged/D12795.PDF

Abstract

Animal diseases, foodborne pathogens and foodborne diseases have enormous impacts upon the health and livelihoods of producers and consumers in developing and in-transition countries. Unfortunately, the capacity for effective surveillance of infectious disease threats is often limited in these countries, leading to chronic under-reporting. This further contributes towards underestimating the effects of these diseases and an inability to implement effective control measures. However, innovative communications and diagnostic tools, as well as new analytical approaches and close cooperation within and between the animal and human health sectors, can be used to improve the coverage, quality and speed of reporting, as well as to generate more comprehensive estimates of the disease burden. These approaches can help to tackle endemic diseases and build essential surveillance capacities to address changing disease threats in the future.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Halliday, Dr Joanna
Authors: de Balogh, K., Halliday, J., and Lubroth, J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
Journal Name:Revue scientifique et technique (International Office of Epizootics)
ISSN:0253-1933

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
568221Impact, ecology and social determinants of bacterial zoonoses in northern TanzaniaSarah CleavelandBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)BB/J010367/1RI BIODIVERSITY ANIMAL HEALTH & COMPMED