Digital curation skills in the performing arts: an investigation of practitioner awareness and knowledge of digital object management and preservation

Molloy, L. (2014) Digital curation skills in the performing arts: an investigation of practitioner awareness and knowledge of digital object management and preservation. International Journal of Performance Arts and Digital Media, 10(1), pp. 7-20. (doi: 10.1080/14794713.2014.912496)

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Abstract

This study examines the digital curation awareness and practice of a sample of practitioners from the UK performing arts community. Twelve performance arts practitioners from across the United Kingdom were interviewed to establish understanding of whether, why and how they create and manage digital objects in the course of their creative work. Detailed qualitative data from this series of one-to-one interviews about the actual and intended digital curation practices of these performance arts practitioners establish what they understand about sustainable management of digital objects, and also which digital curation activities they actually include in their working processes. This knowledge is supplemented with some preliminary exploration of the types of digital resources that are sought and used by performance arts practitioners, in order to understand whether there is a comparable appetite for the creation and for the reuse of digital objects in this field. Questions in the interview identify the sources used by practitioners when attempting to access digital objects created by others as part of research for their own creative work. This provides a ‘practitioner's-eye view’ of performance collections; that is to say, the resources used by practitioners as collections for research, irrespective of the formal designation or intended purpose of such resources. Here, this enquiry is set into the broader context of digital curation and preservation. The approach to the interviewing is described, findings are discussed and the presence of possible skills and knowledge gaps is presented. Concluding remarks indicate the implications of these indicative findings for the representation of performance arts practice for current and future generations, and suggest useful future areas of enquiry.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Journal of Performance Arts and Digital Media on 30 June 2014, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.1080/14794713.2014.912496
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Molloy, Ms Laura
Authors: Molloy, L.
College/School:College of Arts > School of Humanities > Information Studies
Journal Name:International Journal of Performance Arts and Digital Media
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1479-4713
ISSN (Online):2040-0934
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2014 Taylor & Francis
First Published:First published in the International Journal of Performance Arts and Digital Media 10(1):7-20
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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