Assessment of plasma and red cell trace element concentrations, disease severity, and outcome in patients with critical illness

Stefanowicz, F., Gashut, R. A., Talwar, D., Duncan, A., Beulshausen, J. F., McMillan, D. C. and Kinsella, J. (2014) Assessment of plasma and red cell trace element concentrations, disease severity, and outcome in patients with critical illness. Journal of Critical Care, 29(2), pp. 214-218. (doi:10.1016/j.jcrc.2013.10.012)

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Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of the study is to examine the value of both plasma and red cell trace element measurements when assessing nutritional status in patients with critical illness.<p></p> Materials and Methods: A total of 125 patients who were admitted to intensive care unit with evidence of systemic inflammatory response as per Bone's criteria were recruited. Venous blood samples were obtained from all on admission and, in 31 of the 125 patients, on approximately days 4 and 7. Copper, zinc, and selenium concentrations were measured in plasma and erythrocytes and results related to mortality and patient outcome measures.<p></p> Results: A total of 125 critically ill patients were recruited; 81 (66%) were male, the median age was 60 (range, 18-100), and the medical/surgical proportion was 55/70 (44%/56%). The median (lower and upper 2.5th percentile) Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score, and length of stay and mortality were 21 (16-26), 7 (4-9) 3.7 days (1.5-11.1) and 19%, respectively. Plasma zinc and selenium concentrations were significantly lower on admission compared with reference intervals, whereas copper was increased. Normal plasma glutathione peroxidase activity suggested selenium status was adequate on admission; erythrocyte concentrations of glutathione peroxidase and trace elements were normal, suggesting adequate nutritional status 1 to 2 months before admission. Only plasma zinc and selenium were inversely associated with C-reactive protein (rs = − 0.266, P = .004, rs = − 0.322, P < .001, respectively). Compared with survivors, albumin (P < .001) concentrations were significantly lower in the nonsurvivor group. No significant difference of plasma selenium and zinc between survivors and nonsurvivors was found, although plasma selenium concentrations tended to be lower (P = .04). On multivariate logistic regression analysis of the significant variables, none was independently associated with mortality.<p></p> Conclusion: The altered plasma concentrations of zinc, selenium, and copper in patients with critical illness were primarily due to the effects of the systemic inflammatory response and do not reliably indicate their status.<p></p>

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Kinsella, Professor John and McMillan, Professor Donald
Authors: Stefanowicz, F., Gashut, R. A., Talwar, D., Duncan, A., Beulshausen, J. F., McMillan, D. C., and Kinsella, J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:Journal of Critical Care
Publisher:WB Saunders
ISSN:0883-9441
ISSN (Online):1557-8615

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