Infant feeding in relation to eating patterns in the second year of life and weight status in the fourth year

Abraham, E. C., Godwin, J., Sherriff, A. and Armstrong, J. (2012) Infant feeding in relation to eating patterns in the second year of life and weight status in the fourth year. Public Health Nutrition, 15(09), pp. 1705-1714. (doi:10.1017/S1368980012002686)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980012002686

Abstract

<b>Objective</b> To explore associations of early infant feeding with (i) eating patterns in the second year of life and (ii) weight status in the fourth year of life in a prospective cohort of children in Scotland. Design Growing Up in Scotland (GUS) longitudinal birth cohort study (2005–2008).<p></p> <b>Setting</b> Scotland, UK.<p></p> <b>Subjects</b> Children aged 9–12 months (n 5217) followed through to 45–48 months.<p></p> <b>Results</b> Infant feeding was associated with eating patterns, defined by using SPSS two-step cluster analysis, in the second year of life. Children who were ever breast-fed compared with never breast-fed (adjusted OR = 1·48, 95 % CI 1·27, 1·73) were more likely to have a positive eating pattern (Cluster 2). Children who started complementary feeding at 4–5 months or 6–10 months compared with 0–3 months (adjusted OR = 1·32, 95 % CI 1·09, 1·59 or AOR = 1·50, 95 % CI 1·19, 1·89) were more likely to belong to Cluster 2. Breast-feeding was negatively associated with being overweight or obese in the fourth year of life compared with no breast-feeding (adjusted OR = 0·81, 95 % CI 0·81, 1·01). Introduction of complementary feeding at 4–5 months compared with 0–3 months was negatively associated with being overweight or obese (adjusted OR = 0·74, 95 % CI 0·57, 0·97).<p></p> <b>Conclusions</b> Breast-feeding and introduction of complementary feeding after 4 months were associated with a positive eating pattern in the second year of life. Introduction of complementary feeding at 4–5 months compared with 0–3 months was negatively associated with being overweight or obese.<p></p>

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Sherriff, Dr Andrea
Authors: Abraham, E. C., Godwin, J., Sherriff, A., and Armstrong, J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Dental School
Journal Name:Public Health Nutrition
Publisher:Cambridge
ISSN:1368-9800
ISSN (Online):1475-2727

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