Imagined productive communities: industrial rationalisation and cultural crisis in the 1930s

Clarke, J. (2000) Imagined productive communities: industrial rationalisation and cultural crisis in the 1930s. Modern and Contemporary France, 8(3), pp. 345-357. (doi:10.1080/09639480050057356)

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Abstract

This article discusses the French interwar movement in favour of the rationalisation of work and its ideas for a new industrial order. It argues that these ideas were shaped by anxieties about the social consequences of mass production and that a preoccupation with the (re-)creation of productive communities was central to the rationalisation project in France. Rather than embracing American-style mass production as the only model for modernisation, the French modernisers discussed here sought to map out a distinctive route: they sought ways in which goods could be produced on a mass scale, while workers were organised on a human scale, or even returned to the land. Such ambitions gesture just as much towards the passéisme of the Révolution nationale as to the model of Fordist America or the postwar transformation of France.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Clarke, Dr Jackie
Authors: Clarke, J.
College/School:College of Arts > School of Modern Languages and Cultures > French
Journal Name:Modern and Contemporary France
ISSN:0963-9489
ISSN (Online):1469-9869

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